Best residential load center

electrofelon

Senior Member
One other comment, that granted gets beyond the thread title of "residential" is another thing that really annoys me about square D is their lower cost homeline line is not available in three phase so you have to use overpriced QO. The other guys offer everything in three phase.
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
One other comment, that granted gets beyond the thread title of "residential" is another thing that really annoys me about square D is their lower cost homeline line is not available in three phase so you have to use overpriced QO. The other guys offer everything in three phase.
Well, it does say "home." :)

That's where BR shines for me.
 

kwired

Electron manager
One other comment, that granted gets beyond the thread title of "residential" is another thing that really annoys me about square D is their lower cost homeline line is not available in three phase so you have to use overpriced QO. The other guys offer everything in three phase.
When they came out with Homeline it was for the purpose of having a product that is competitive in the residental market. I honestly don't think three phase loadcenters or three pole breakers would be significantly less if they made them for that line, so why not just stick with QO for those applications? I doubt if they made a bolt on version it would be significantly less either.

Eaton acquired the BR line from someone else, and chose to continue with it pretty much as is. Had they decided to make their own series that would be competition to Homeline, something tells me it would have been only single phase as well.
 

curt swartz

Senior Member
I was a test contractor for Homeline when it was introduced. I was told that the reason for having 2 lines was to allow sales of QO at a higher price point for commercial/industrial markets and use the HOM to compete with the residential market. If they were to offer 3 phase HOM it would defeat the purpose of having 2 lines.

QO and HOM breakers have the same internals, only the case is different so SquareD's build cost is the same. The load center boxes are the same except for QO's are slightly shorter since the breakers are 3/4" instead of 1". The HOM busing is slightly cheaper since its AL vs QO which is copper. Basically SquareD could offer an aluminum bused version of QO and their cost would be essentially the same as HOM. They want to be able to market a higher priced line of equipment.

Also wanted to add:
For those posting they don't like HOM loadcenters with the new wire entry design. This is just an option, you can still get standard KO's. All of the load centers I purchase come with KO's.
 

kwired

Electron manager
I was a test contractor for Homeline when it was introduced. I was told that the reason for having 2 lines was to allow sales of QO at a higher price point for commercial/industrial markets and use the HOM to compete with the residential market. If they were to offer 3 phase HOM it would defeat the purpose of having 2 lines.

QO and HOM breakers have the same internals, only the case is different so SquareD's build cost is the same. The load center boxes are the same except for QO's are slightly shorter since the breakers are 3/4" instead of 1". The HOM busing is slightly cheaper since its AL vs QO which is copper. Basically SquareD could offer an aluminum bused version of QO and their cost would be essentially the same as HOM. They want to be able to market a higher priced line of equipment.

Also wanted to add:
For those posting they don't like HOM loadcenters with the new wire entry design. This is just an option, you can still get standard KO's. All of the load centers I purchase come with KO's.
Other than it wasn't offered in the three phase versions it was like purchasing a Buick instead of the Cadillac. 3/4 inch wide breakers instead of 1" wide breakers has some space advantages. Now that 42 circuit rule is gone 60, 72, 84 circuit panels are possible and not as tall with QO as they are with any 1" wide breaker Those are more common with "panelboards" than they are with "loadcenters" but still something to consider. Though you are not supposed to work things "hot" I'd rather work in a live QO panel than a live Homeline panel, less bus is exposed on unused spaces.
 

ptonsparky

Senior Member
One of the Custom Home ECs in the area quit QO and switched to CH because of the response he got from QO over their AFCIs random tripping.
 

electrofelon

Senior Member
I honestly don't think three phase loadcenters or three pole breakers would be significantly less if they made them for that line, so why not just stick with QO for those applications? I doubt if they made a bolt on version it would be significantly less either.
l.
I disagree. A qo320 is about $70. A Siemens q320 is half that. HOM breakers are half the price of the QO version. QO is overpriced.
 

Frank DuVal

Senior Member
I'm an old CH type guy.

But I've worked with QO, Homeline, Siemens, GE, Bryant (many versions) etc etc.

Still a preference for CH even if I cannot state what that is....:D
 

peter d

Senior Member
Same here, Peter.
:thumbsup:

I think Eaton CH BR is going to take over here pretty soon. The major suppliers are carrying it for their main line now, and Square D still has limited distribution as they always have. Unless you're on a buying program getting really good pricing on QO, it's definitely overpriced.

Speaking of that, is anyone on a BR buying program? What kind of quantity do you have to commit to?
 

Knuckle Dragger

Master Electrician Electrical Contractor 01752
There was only one electrical supply house in the area that carried square d. I was told that they couldn't carry other brands or square d would shut them off.
The supply house just closed it's doors (nothing to do with SD) they just retired.
 
Siemens

Siemens

If I was putting one in my own home I would go with Siemens. It's personal taste. You can get a 40/80 with a copper bus for around 160 bucks. They come with the ground bars included in case you are putting it after a disconnect which is nice.
 

mbrooke

Senior Member
:thumbsup:

I think Eaton CH BR is going to take over here pretty soon. The major suppliers are carrying it for their main line now, and Square D still has limited distribution as they always have. Unless you're on a buying program getting really good pricing on QO, it's definitely overpriced.

Speaking of that, is anyone on a BR buying program? What kind of quantity do you have to commit to?
Can you post pics of these new BR load centers?
 

jeff48356

Senior Member
If I was putting one in my own home I would go with Siemens. It's personal taste. You can get a 40/80 with a copper bus for around 160 bucks. They come with the ground bars included in case you are putting it after a disconnect which is nice.
The 40/80 Square-D Homeline sells for $127 at Home Depot, and comes with some breakers. That's always the panel that I install when wiring a new house.
 

kwired

Electron manager
I'm an old CH type guy.

But I've worked with QO, Homeline, Siemens, GE, Bryant (many versions) etc etc.

Still a preference for CH even if I cannot state what that is....:D
One kind of gets used to something they use a lot and just feels good about it because of it's familiarity I think. I am a little biased toward Square D in general, partly because I am so familiar with their products and know how to navigate the catalog when needed. But my main supplier is a Square D distributor and can get anything out of the catalog if needed, and they don't have Eaton, Siemens, or GE power distribution products. Other suppliers that do have those don't necessarily have great ability to get anything those others offer either. One place stocked GE loadcenters, but if you wanted motor controls and such stocked Siemens. Makes sense, right?

There was only one electrical supply house in the area that carried square d. I was told that they couldn't carry other brands or square d would shut them off.
The supply house just closed it's doors (nothing to do with SD) they just retired.
I think that may be more common for the smaller supply houses, but those are disappearing or at least being bought out by larger companies. Those larger companies still purchase enough volume that Square D isn't as particular about it. I know my nearest Square D distributor once was one of those small companies and they had to get rid of the CH-line they used to sell or Square D wouldn't give them dealership status. That store is still open, been sold to bigger company, and then eventually sold again. The current owner has places nationwide, and still owns competing stores in some places that are right across the street from one another but with different names, and different product lines in certain aspects.
 

Knuckle Dragger

Master Electrician Electrical Contractor 01752
I was a "square D only" about 20+ years ago. One time I needed to do a service replacement on the fly. The closet distributor carried Siemens. The design was so much more practical than the square D with the full length neutral bar. Eventually Siemens backed away from the full length neutral bar and now square D has it.
I now use mostly Eaton BR for the residential jobs.
 

MAC702

Senior Member
One other comment, that granted gets beyond the thread title of "residential" is another thing that really annoys me about square D is their lower cost homeline line is not available in three phase so you have to use overpriced QO. The other guys offer everything in three phase.
I've tried Googling them and can't find them now, but I know I used 3-phase Homeline breakers/panels when I worked in Colombia in 2005. One of them I took new out of the factory sealed box and gave myself a 3-phase shock through the three fingers that were touching the screws as I installed it. I've never seen before or since a breaker in a factory box in the "on" state.
 
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