Computer to TV conn

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MRI

Member
I just installed cat 5 wiring in a hair salon. It has four separate rooms that they work in and the owner wanted an internet connection in each room. Now she wants to mount a tv in each room so the hair technician can access the internet then connect their computer to the tv. What is the best method for computer to tv wiring? HDMI? RS232? Cat5?

Thanks in advance............
 

Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
I suppose it depends on what the output capabilities of the PC is.
It's very common to have a VGA output.
Some newer have DVI output.
Then some recent models have HDMI output.

Then you have the Tv some have HDMI , component and DVI , and then some do not have all the various inputs.

You can get an adapter from DVI to HDMI and you will need to have a sperate audio cable.

There are many variables here.:mad:
 

MRI

Member
I am assuming the computers are fairly new and the tv's haven't been purchased yet so I can make sure they have the right ports for what would make the best choice. I was leaning towards just installing an HDMI between computer and tv, that way I get audio and video in one cable.
 

gar

Senior Member
091213-2112 EST

From post #1 I have no idea what the customer really wants.

There needs to be a clear definition of all of the different functions the customer wants.

For example: Is the TV to be a large monitor for the PC? From what source are the TV signals to be obtained? Etc.

.
 

MRI

Member
Basically the tv will just be a large monitor for the computer for now. There are no plans for cable or satellite for now. So if they view a website or play a DVD they can view it on the tv on the wall.
 

gar

Senior Member
091213-2152 EST

Take a laptop and go to a TV store. Experimentally determine how you can connect the PC to what seems to be a suitable TV from the literature and see if you can actually do what you want, and that the image quality is what you expect it to be. Obviously the laptop needs a VGA connector for you to run this experiment, and the TV has to have a similar connector.

I am not satisfied with the Sony PC input on my Bravia. Image quality is not what I would expect.

There may be some means via an Ethernet connection to get your PC screen display on the TV. This would require software in the PC, and a well designed TV to make it easy. I do not know if this possibility exists in commericial products.

Do a search on HDMI cards for PCs and try to figure out what capabilities they might afford. My quick search did not provide any information I could summarize for you. A lot of words without a clear cut description of the logic of a system using these cards. My guess is there are a lot of road blocks.

.
 

cschmid

Senior Member
I have a tv with the pc connection and Gar is correct it is not that great and to do HDMI you need a card and software. good luck with that and more info would be nice. you monitor and computer has to be matched the universal feature is a very course picture.
 

brantmacga

Senior Member
Location
Georgia
Occupation
Electrical contractor
most all laptops have a VGA output; the easiest thing to do here is put a shelf under the TV, and let them purchase VGA cables. They'll also need 1/8" stereo to RCA for audio.

I don't know of any video cards with HDMI outputs that process audio and integrate it within the same cable. I think its possible I've seen one. Other cards I've seen have a S/PDIF input, which you loop with your existing audio card to get sound on the HDMI cable.

Putting the computer at the TV is going to be the simplest solution to make sure everyone can be compatible. If they don't want to do that, look into VGA over Cat5 converters. You'll need to run Cat5 and audio cable to the TV. The converters are going to be around $100 each.

If the computer has DVI or HDMI outputs, HDMI to VGA converters are available, as well as DVI to HDMI. They'll need 1/8" stereo to RCA for audio.
 

TOOL_5150

Senior Member
Location
bay area, ca
Honestly, I did not read any of the other replies - but if you want the computer with monitor connected to also be a TV - you need to install a tv tuner card in each of the computers and bring a cable line to each room - then you can have the monitor double as a computer screen / tv / dvd player.

~Matt
 

brantmacga

Senior Member
Location
Georgia
Occupation
Electrical contractor
Honestly, I did not read any of the other replies - but if you want the computer with monitor connected to also be a TV - you need to install a tv tuner card in each of the computers and bring a cable line to each room - then you can have the monitor double as a computer screen / tv / dvd player.

~Matt
I didn't see anything in the question about having the computer handle television tuning, but the answer here is to run the cable straight to the television.

Instead of explaining in depth why running the TV cable to the computer location, I'll just tell you that is a very bad idea for the setup described.
 

TOOL_5150

Senior Member
Location
bay area, ca
I didn't see anything in the question about having the computer handle television tuning, but the answer here is to run the cable straight to the television.

Instead of explaining in depth why running the TV cable to the computer location, I'll just tell you that is a very bad idea for the setup described.
Yeah, now that I re-read the OP his best option is to have a monitor that has both tv cable and vga/dvi/hdmi inputs for both tv and computer.


~Matt
 

MRI

Member
For right now I just want the tv on the wall to show what is on the laptop screen. No tv tuning at all. So what I think from reading all this is to get a tv/monitor that has cable input as well as vga/dvi/hdmi inputs. This way I can connect the computer to it and run cable straight to the tv/monitor in the future if the customer requests it. :-?
 

__dan

Senior Member
computer on a TV

computer on a TV

The computer connects to the TV with DVI or HDMI. I believe HDMI has sound in the cable and DVI does not. Conversion from HDMI to DVI is a cable with different (appropriate) ends. If the PC only outputs DVI, the sound can be routed separately. Plan on very short cable lengths, PC close to the display.

HDTV's have two resolutions, 720p and 1080p. For displaying a computer signal on a large screen, only 1080p will be satisfactory. Matching resolutions between the PC output and TV display is very important. So the TV will have to be a 1080p (1920 x 1200) display and the video card in the PC will have to (be able to) be set to 1920 x 1200 output. PC integrated graphics will not drive this, you need a decent plug in graphics card. If it's a laptop, check the max display resolution. Trying to downgrade resolution or match lower or odd resolution standards is asking for trouble. It will work but probably look like it needs adjustment. Buy equipment that matches the display resolution.

The Tv tuner should be built into the TV, otherwise you need a separate tuner and another input port on the display. Buy a graphics card with HDMI output.
 
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Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
The computer connects to the TV with DVI or HDMI. I believe HDMI has sound in the cable and DVI does not. Conversion from HDMI to DVI is a cable with different (appropriate) ends. If the PC only outputs DVI, the sound can be routed separately. Plan on very short cable lengths, PC close to the display.

HDTV's have two resolutions, 720p and 1080p. For displaying a computer signal on a large screen, only 1080p will be satisfactory. Matching resolutions between the PC output and TV display is very important. So the TV will have to be a 1080p (1920 x 1200) display and the video card in the PC will have to (be able to) be set to 1920 x 1200 output. PC integrated graphics will not drive this, you need a decent plug in graphics card. If it's a laptop, check the max display resolution. Trying to downgrade resolution or match lower or odd resolution standards is asking for trouble. It will work but probably look like it needs adjustment. Buy equipment that matches the display resolution.

The Tv tuner should be built into the TV, otherwise you need a separate tuner and another input port on the display. Buy a graphics card with HDMI output.

As per my original post there are many variables.
DVI or HDMI is the way to go as some TV's do not work well with VGA input. A word of advice when using 1080 and either HDMI or a DVI cable note that the writing on the screen from a browser window will be very small. 720P is a bit more easily read and I bet most customers will not notice the difference. in the lower resolution.

Note that most media laptops will have either DVI or HDMI out's. I would not use a VGA to HDMI converter as that is what is usually in the TV already if you use the VGA port.
 

brantmacga

Senior Member
Location
Georgia
Occupation
Electrical contractor
The computer connects to the TV with DVI or HDMI. I believe HDMI has sound in the cable and DVI does not. Conversion from HDMI to DVI is a cable with different (appropriate) ends. If the PC only outputs DVI, the sound can be routed separately. Plan on very short cable lengths, PC close to the display.

HDTV's have two resolutions, 720p and 1080p. For displaying a computer signal on a large screen, only 1080p will be satisfactory. Matching resolutions between the PC output and TV display is very important. So the TV will have to be a 1080p (1920 x 1200) display and the video card in the PC will have to (be able to) be set to 1920 x 1200 output. PC integrated graphics will not drive this, you need a decent plug in graphics card. If it's a laptop, check the max display resolution. Trying to downgrade resolution or match lower or odd resolution standards is asking for trouble. It will work but probably look like it needs adjustment. Buy equipment that matches the display resolution.

The Tv tuner should be built into the TV, otherwise you need a separate tuner and another input port on the display. Buy a graphics card with HDMI output.
Can't say I agree with much of that.

1080p is not a requirement. My graphics card software (nvidia) matches the resolution of my 1080i television (1366x768).

Video cards that combine sound on HDMI are rare; those that do combine sound from an existing audio card, and need to be looped via S/PDIF.

Short cable lengths are not required. I've done installs of over 100' using the appropriate materials.


VGA is high definition, and perfectly acceptable.

It doesn't necessarily take a high end video card. Although I have a nice one at home, I have a 42" LCD at the office being driven by one of those small form factor ITX board computers with on-board video, and it handles DVD's, netflix, and hulu just fine.
 

mxslick

Senior Member
Location
SE Idaho
Guys, a lot of unnecessary info was handed out here in this thread so far..not meaningless, so don't be insulted, but it is clouding the issue too much. :)

The solution is very simple:

Step 1: Make sure the TV's can accept HDMI (Or DVI with an HDMI to DVI Adapter)
Step 2: Make sure computer video out is HDMI
Step 3: Run good quality HDMI cables from each TV to the computer location (Try not to exceed 50 feet as that is about the limit for a stable HDMI signal, any longer and you'll need signal boosters)
Step 4: Install THIS HDMI ROUTER at the computer location and connect your TV's to it.

Done.

The website referenced in the link (Markertek.com) has all the stuff you'll need to do the job.

Edited to add: It is VERY important to use a video router as per my link, DO NOT try to "daisy chain" the HDMI (or any other signal cables) as you WILL have serious performance issues!!
 
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__dan

Senior Member
display resolutions

display resolutions

For moving pictures, TV and movies, I have read that the difference between 720p and 1080p is not very noticeable. It will be easier for the equipment to match display resolution at 720p. I have not tried that. I run a 1080i HDTV tuner, a Samsung 260 DTBF, to a 1080p monitor with DVI and the sound separately to speakers.

That's an arrangement that may work for TV, movies, and Youtube, 720p from the PC to the flatscreen over DVI and separate speakers for the PC sound. Or a separate sound cable / optical SPDIF to the regular speakers. PC integrated graphics will usually drive 720p.

For longer distances there are inexpensive signal range extending equipment over cat5, like:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817707054&cm_re=vga_extender-_-17-707-054-_-Product

or

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16815524002&cm_re=video_range_extender-_-15-524-002-_-Product

But that's not the application here, sounds like they want internet / lan connected PC's in the same room to plug into a flatscreen HDTV.

For anything that requires real sharpness, like looking at still pictures with thin lines, CAD or graphics, trying to run 720p on a large screen will look fuzzy. If you saw 720p and 1080p still graphics side by side the 720p would get thrown out. If you saw only the 720p with still thin lines on it you might catch something wrong with the display. It is a saleability and customer satisfaction issue if they thought they could do better.

Going from 720p to 1080p, yes the text is smaller and sharper, but, more 'display' fits on the screen, ie no scrolling to see the whole picture.

A 1080p graphics card is $80. or less. The adder for the flatscreen going from 720p to 1080p is 2 to 3 hundred. Once chosen, the installed equipment has a service lifetime over 10 years. So the cost per day for the upgrade over the life of the install is a no brainer.

There is a usability and serviceability customer issue. What happens when they try to display something, in the customer area they want a 'wow' factor. What happens when they get the 'mmmph' factor. It's unpredictable, something in a photo on the TV will look wrong, or you will have to scroll to see all of it.

Bottom line, the customer wants jungle rules, has to be better than the other. It also has to be easy to run and not require repeat tech service calls. They should not futz around trying to adjust the thing and feel compelled to buy upgrades later to get it to run right. There is not much the tech can do to increase sharpness on a lower resolution display.

The customer would like the cost savings upfront, but I always figure the cost spread over the service lifetime.

Repeat calls to come and adjust the thing would drive me nuts.
 

Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
Can't say I agree with much of that.

1080p is not a requirement. My graphics card software (nvidia) matches the resolution of my 1080i television (1366x768).

Video cards that combine sound on HDMI are rare; those that do combine sound from an existing audio card, and need to be looped via S/PDIF.

Short cable lengths are not required. I've done installs of over 100' using the appropriate materials.


VGA is high definition, and perfectly acceptable.

It doesn't necessarily take a high end video card. Although I have a nice one at home, I have a 42" LCD at the office being driven by one of those small form factor ITX board computers with on-board video, and it handles DVD's, netflix, and hulu just fine.
VGA is an old standard with many resolution levels. For some reason but in my experience does not produce as well a picture as with DVI or HDMI on a large flat panel. Hey for some reason my Flat panel says use only VGA for a computer. well I tried that and the picture was not so good. The TV would only accept a low resolution not what would be 720 or 1080> I used a HDMI to VGA cable and can use 1080 or 720. I like the type size in the browser URL as well as other computer programs in 720. It works in both 1080 and 720.
 
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