Conduit

cowboyjwc

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Simi Valley, CA
Hope I can do this justice. Have a pull box in the ceiling of an office building. One of the conduits comes into the box at about a 22 degree angle (maybe a little less) so that only about one tooth of the lock nut is even touching the box (no grounding conductor). The contractor wants to tell me that it's to code so I open the box, which I hadn't done previously (that's when I saw the lock nut) and there were two four inch holes in the back of the box and no plastic bushings on the conduit.

Still want to argue code?
 

qcroanoke

Sometimes I don't know if I'm the boxer or the bag
Location
Roanoke, VA.
Occupation
Engineering
Hope I can do this justice. Have a pull box in the ceiling of an office building. One of the conduits comes into the box at about a 22 degree angle (maybe a little less) so that only about one tooth of the lock nut is even touching the box (no grounding conductor). The contractor wants to tell me that it's to code so I open the box, which I hadn't done previously (that's when I saw the lock nut) and there were two four inch holes in the back of the box and no plastic bushings on the conduit.

Still want to argue code?
in reference to the bushings, what size wire? ;)
 

NorthwestPV

Member
Location
Oregon, US
Just tell them that the installation needs to be done in a workmanlike manner. For the system to be grounded properly the connector needs to make full contact with the box. If they argue with that, pull out the AHJ card. LOL
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I was gonna say 3 for some reason. What if the connector is PVC and has your #4 s or my #3 s, does it still need a plastic bushing?
Some people don't think it does, I disagree unless the fitting is designed with a rounded edge making it not necessary - haven't seen a PVC TA yet that doesn't have a fairly sharp edge. Typical insulated throat metallic raceway fittings are likely intended to eliminate the need for a bushing though.
 
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