Crock Pot Sparks

ELA

Senior Member
My Wife does not like when I unplug - unused appliances

My Wife does not like when I unplug - unused appliances

I have a habit of unplugging unused appliances and my wife thinks it is unwarranted.
(understood it needs to be plugged in when being used)

I have witnessed shorted appliance cords a number of times. Usually a 20 amp circuit so it can make a mess.
 

ActionDave

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Durango, CO, 10 h 20 min without traffic from wing
Occupation
wire pulling grunt
I have a habit of unplugging unused appliances and my wife thinks it is unwarranted.
(understood it needs to be plugged in when being used)

I have witnessed shorted appliance cords a number of times. Usually a 20 amp circuit so it can make a mess.
It is the nature of married couples to disagree. My evidence is anecdotal based on personal observations of others and my own life experience, but I haven't come across an exception yet.
 

tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
Its likely during the remodel you will end up with AFCI protection, if any recpts are replaced.
On my kitchen counter, the recp I plug toaster into and unplug is now quite loose. It was probably a .39 cent special I got from Eagle Hardware, before they become Lowes. If I replace it I have to use a AFCI...or probably the DF type with GFCI.
 

ActionDave

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Durango, CO, 10 h 20 min without traffic from wing
Occupation
wire pulling grunt
Its likely during the remodel you will end up with AFCI protection, if any recpts are replaced.
On my kitchen counter, the recp I plug toaster into and unplug is now quite loose. It was probably a .39 cent special I got from Eagle Hardware, before they become Lowes. If I replace it I have to use a AFCI...or probably the DF type with GFCI.
Man oh man! You really know how to have a good time.
 

charlie b

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Seattle, WA
Occupation
Electrical Engineer
Its likely during the remodel you will end up with AFCI protection, if any recpts are replaced.
I am concerned about this. The panel was replaced right after we bought the house, about 12 years ago. I do not know whether it is a type that can accept AFCI breakers. In one sense, the receptacles are not being replaced, in that they are essentially being relocated (from wall to under cabinet Wiremold). But the old ones won't be reused, so this is a weak argument. I will discuss with the assigned electrician, but only if he or she mentions it first. :happyyes:

 

ActionDave

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Durango, CO, 10 h 20 min without traffic from wing
Occupation
wire pulling grunt
I am concerned about this. The panel was replaced right after we bought the house, about 12 years ago. I do not know whether it is a type that can accept AFCI breakers. In one sense, the receptacles are not being replaced, in that they are essentially being relocated (from wall to under cabinet Wiremold). But the old ones won't be reused, so this is a weak argument. I will discuss with the assigned electrician, but only if he or she mentions it first. :happyyes:

Your breaker panel will accept AFCI breakers I'm sure. I would never install them in my own house.
 

Adamjamma

Senior Member
I have a habit of unplugging unused appliances and my wife thinks it is unwarranted.
(understood it needs to be plugged in when being used)

I have witnessed shorted appliance cords a number of times. Usually a 20 amp circuit so it can make a mess.
My own opinion is that the reason why the british designed their outlets with on off switches in them is because they felt that the act of unplugging the cords would lead to the cords eventually breaking from the strain of unplugging them improperly while in a hurry. You want prove this is possible? Own IPads and have grandkids using them... see how many IPad cables you go through yearly. Now imagine it was not 5volts 2Amps but was 120volts 15amps...
 

ptonsparky

Senior Member
Location
NE (9.06 miles @5.9 Degrees from Winged Horses)
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
My own opinion is that the reason why the british designed their outlets with on off switches in them is because they felt that the act of unplugging the cords would lead to the cords eventually breaking from the strain of unplugging them improperly while in a hurry. You want prove this is possible? Own IPads and have grandkids using them... see how many IPad cables you go through yearly. Now imagine it was not 5volts 2Amps but was 120volts 15amps...
I was going to suggest that you make those kids replace the cables with their own dime, but then I see you said 'grandkids'. That changes everything. Continue on.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I am concerned about this. The panel was replaced right after we bought the house, about 12 years ago. I do not know whether it is a type that can accept AFCI breakers. In one sense, the receptacles are not being replaced, in that they are essentially being relocated (from wall to under cabinet Wiremold). But the old ones won't be reused, so this is a weak argument. I will discuss with the assigned electrician, but only if he or she mentions it first. :happyyes:

If it was replaced with something "new" 12 years ago, it has AFCI's that are listed to work in it. Same product lines being made today were available then.

My own opinion is that the reason why the british designed their outlets with on off switches in them is because they felt that the act of unplugging the cords would lead to the cords eventually breaking from the strain of unplugging them improperly while in a hurry. You want prove this is possible? Own IPads and have grandkids using them... see how many IPad cables you go through yearly. Now imagine it was not 5volts 2Amps but was 120volts 15amps...
I don't see how a switch effects the strain put on the cord when pulling on the cord instead of pulling on the plug itself, unless this switch also would have a mechanical "jaw release" for the receptacle.
 

Adamjamma

Senior Member
with the switch in place, you turn off the switch but leave the device plugged in... no current draw...
unlike those devices plugged in with no switches to use. they stay using a small amount of electricity on standby.
Most days here in UK I use less than 4 pence electricity per minute, except when heating stuff, and sometimes it is less than 2 pence per minute... for a three floor home with kids, adults, all electric.

So, I prefer the built in switches like the UK uses but only have that if I use specialty switch/outlet devices. But, considering it yet wife says it is OTT..lol... Which is why I spend so much time trying to figure out what the standby current is for the battery systems... off grid gets tricky that way...lol...

But, when connected to grid, not too worried about the minimal draw of leaving the microwave plugged in all the time.
 
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