discusion at work

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markstg

Senior Member
Location
Big Easy
Thanks Charlie, I was trying to phrase it not as a NEC issue but as a design issue, and your answer was very clear,

PS...on another topic, relay coordination...I think your method is great, regarding your specifications. This is so often overlooked in the commercial area. No reply please, as this is way off post.
 

mistabass

Member
Location
Rhode Island
i appologize for all the commotion / it was a hypothtical question i would never do that either just looking for if there is a code violation again i appologize
 

Power Tech

Senior Member
I only use 20 amp receptacles and 20 amp circuits and never over 5 receptacles on a circuit. I don?t install 15 amp receptacles or 15 amp circuits feeding receptacles. You get what you pay for and you pay for what you get I tell people if you are looking at the bottom line then don't waste my time, life is too short.
I put only one if I know it needs it. Other than that no more than a dozen in commercial. In custom residential I go room by room with the new AFCI. 5 in the bedroom on average. Bath gets a dedicated 20A even if it is 1 receptacle.
Like the part about the bottom line. If you do good work, and people like you, you can at least choose who you will do work for. I interview my customers and make sure they have funding before I even pick up a tool.
I do a wide range of work. I follow the plans and specs. No romex (except to tie the ladders down) in the oilfield. No 20 receptacles in residential. I do my best to follow the industry standard. If I put a light in a backyard pool enclosure, with the same parts I use in the oil field, I am sure I would get feedback and deserve it. Overbuild a bid job and you will go broke. The standard can very from area to area, job to job...... When in Rome.
 

celtic

Senior Member
Location
NJ
Here is the answer:

-
how many recp. can you put on 15 amp circuit ?

As many as you want.


What is the second question?

80%?

Applies only to continuous loads.



I'm on a new laptop [yea me] and I haven't put the NEC on it yet [or even my bookmarks] - so IF MEMORY SERVES ME CORRECTLY - the only continuos load in a dwelling unit is the water heater [if elec.].
Therefore, the 80% does not apply to the general lighting/recep. in a dwelling unit.
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
- so IF MEMORY SERVES ME CORRECTLY - the only continuos load in a dwelling unit is the water heater [if elec.].
I believe electric heat is, also. It certainly can be at start-up in winter.


I could be wrong. Hey, it could happen! (<---Not always right, but never in doubt.)
 

mcclary's electrical

Senior Member
Location
VA
No I can't check every breaker,,,,,,I mean just hte ones I've seen. And yes,,,,I mean continuous,,,I work in alot of small factories around here that run 24/7. I'm can only tell you what I've seen.
 
Here is the answer:




As many as you want.


What is the second question?

80%?

Applies only to continuous loads.



I'm on a new laptop [yea me] and I haven't put the NEC on it yet [or even my bookmarks] - so IF MEMORY SERVES ME CORRECTLY - the only continuos load in a dwelling unit is the water heater [if elec.].
Therefore, the 80% does not apply to the general lighting/recep. in a dwelling unit.
What code section validates "as many as you want" 220.14 j?
 
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