dishwasher outlets behind dishwasher?

Smart $

Esteemed Member
Location
Ohio
... In the case of a dishwasher, once you secure it to the counter top it's considered "fixed in place" thus making the receptacle non-accessible.

...
The NEC no longer uses the term "fixed in place" regarding appliances. The 2011 equivalent buzzword is "built-in". :roll:
 

renosteinke

Senior Member
Location
NE Arkansas
Off on a slight tangent ...

In situations like this, there's usually an NEC stipulation thatthe length of the cord not exceed 3 or 6 ft. I really diasgree with those requirements.

I disagree because this almost always means you have to go through all manner of contortions to access the plug. Even if you wanted to place the receptacle right next to the appliance, right abobe the counter for easy access, the cord isn't long enough. It's as if the code committees really want to require you to lay atop the counter, twist sideways, and dangle upsied down in the dark as you attempt to plug it in. Tamper resistant? I'd rather they required ILLUMINATED receptacles!

If I had my way, dishwashers would have 10-ft. long cords. Then you could easily plug / unplug them with the unit well clear of the opening. Or, as is more often the case, it would be easy to fish the plug through the hole in the side of the counter.

Some assert that such appliances ought to be hard-wired, using MC or some other method. I disagree. This equipment gets moved for cleaning, worked on by the serviceman, and replaced every few years. I'd prefer not to have the wiring messed with by all these folks. A cord & plug provides a very easy and sure means to disconnect even the 'built in' versions.

Nor am I happy with the usual method of getting MC to the appliance; too often there's simply a long whip exiting the wall. Even if the opening is plastered over, the repair often fails. I NEVER see a box in the wall, with an extension into the room, with the whip attached to the extension. Indeed, it's usually not even MC, but a long whip of Romex coming out a thmbhole in the wall.
 

jim dungar

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Wisconsin
Occupation
Retired Engineer
Just installed a dishwasher, it can not be removed without having the plumbing disconnected. The 3/8" to 1/2" plumbing is a big difference between a DW and a stove or refrigerator
 

RICK NAPIER

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Off on a slight tangent ...

In situations like this, there's usually an NEC stipulation thatthe length of the cord not exceed 3 or 6 ft. I really diasgree with those requirements.
422.16(B)(2) Built in Dishwashers and Trash Compactors
(2) The length of the cord shall be 3 ft to 4 ft measured from the face of the attahment plug to the plane of the rear of the appliance.

18 to 36 inches for a disposal.
 

goldstar

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
you know It doesn't need one but if goldstar (post 20) wants one in, then please make sure the GFCI is accessible and is not behind the dishwasher. ;)
It was not I who suggested a GFI receptacle but rather the OP who suggested that it be installed so :
it will ensure the "graceful failure" of a dishwasher if it does fail.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
If it's located behind the DW then you'll have to explain to your customer that they'll have to pull out the dishwasher to reset the GFI receptacle. If it's in the sink cabinet they'll have to bend down to reset. Seems a bit over the top to me.
2011 NEC requires GFCI's to be installed in readily accessible locations so a GFCI could not be installed behind the dishwasher, under 2011 NEC.

Again the DW does not require GFCI protection but is not prohibited to connect to one either.
 

goldstar

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Actually, gold-I am the one guilty of quoting you for GFCI protection of the dishwasher and I do apoligize.

It was the OP who brought that into the mix.

Sorry I is....:ashamed1:
No problem. I've been part of the forum for many years. I have thick skin ;)
 

JDB3

Senior Member
I generally put the dishwasher receptacle under the sink. That way if the dishwasher is not working, I do not have to pull it out, I just test the receptacle, & let the homeowner or general contractor know that I have power for the appliance.
 

jxofaltrds

Senior Member
Location
Mike P. Columbus Ohio
Occupation
ESI
I generally put the dishwasher receptacle under the sink. That way if the dishwasher is not working, I do not have to pull it out, I just test the receptacle, & let the homeowner or general contractor know that I have power for the appliance.
And what does this test cost? Do you try to help them over the phone? :?
 

GerryB

Senior Member
I like the feed under the sink and a switch and a "romex" whip, (sorry, why would you use MC?). You can use the same feed for the garbage disposal if they have one. Also every dw I've done was hard wired. If you install an outlet then you have the added wirk of putting a cord and plug on the dw.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I like the feed under the sink and a switch and a "romex" whip, (sorry, why would you use MC?). You can use the same feed for the garbage disposal if they have one. Also every dw I've done was hard wired. If you install an outlet then you have the added wirk of putting a cord and plug on the dw.
Doesn't it take about the same effort to put a cord on as it takes to put a "whip" on?

I usually put the receptacle under sink, and put the cord on the DW - usually before the plumber has been there. When plumber is done connecting water and drain he gets to slide it in the space and all that needs done electrical wise is plug it in.

Same with disposer.
 

goldstar

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Doesn't it take about the same effort to put a cord on as it takes to put a "whip" on?

I usually put the receptacle under sink, and put the cord on the DW - usually before the plumber has been there. When plumber is done connecting water and drain he gets to slide it in the space and all that needs done electrical wise is plug it in.

Same with disposer.
IMHO, and aside from what may or may not be Code issues (as shown by various opinions), I believe this is the best and safest way to do this for everyone involved in either installation or repair of this appliance.
 
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