Energy Code Requirement for Lighting Control

Electriman

Senior Member
Location
TX
Greetings,

I was wondering if anyone knows all or some of the energy codes or any other codes that force us to use lighting control.

Thank you in advance.
 

Strathead

Senior Member
Greetings,

I was wondering if anyone knows all or some of the energy codes or any other codes that force us to use lighting control.

Thank you in advance.

Start with you State Building Code. It most likely has some directly written energy codes and it is also very likely it will reference some for of code standard, such as AHRAE 90 or Title 24. But basically those are considered adopted and integral to the building code, so it is really your building code that will direct you.
 

ron

Senior Member
Last edited:

Strathead

Senior Member
I'm doing some design work in Dallas and we have to follow the 2015 IECC with Dallas Amendments
https://dallascityhall.com/departments/sustainabledevelopment/buildinginspection/DCH documents/pdf/BI_2015_IECC_Amendments_01-25-2017.pdf

That invokes lighting control in other areas but specifically Section C405 https://codes.iccsafe.org/content/IECC2015/chapter-4-ce-commercial-energy-efficiency

Each jurisdiction will adopt its own Energy code, just like they can amend their own Electric Code.
Well here in Florida the only jurisdiction that has authority to amend the NEC is the state.
 

tw1156

Senior Member
Location
Texas
Greetings,

I was wondering if anyone knows all or some of the energy codes or any other codes that force us to use lighting control.

Thank you in advance.
If you're designing commercial here in Texas, the State minimum code is IECC 2015. If you're designing for any public projects with the State, it's ASHRAE 90.1 2016. Municipalities will also have their own variations on IECC. Some have adopted codes less stringent than 2015, and have noted they will not enforce the state minimum mandated IECC 2015 code, so take that for what it's worth. If you're outside of a muncipality (ie, county for example), then you defer to the State codes. NEC 2017 and IECC 2015 as your basis of design.

You'll really need to watch the daylighting zones and provide commchecks as required when submitting plans for approval. We've observed the inspectors mostly looking at the commcheck to count fixtures when on site and not so much focus on the control aspect of it.

There's a lot of exceptions and additional requirements in IECC 2015 that can trigger your project so if you're good at interpreting the funny wording to the NEC, you should be familiar with how 'code' language can be tricky. Just remember to look at what subsection you're under and read from top to bottom as some requirements may appear they apply to your project, but in reality, it may be under a section that your project does not have.
 

Electriman

Senior Member
Location
TX
If you're designing commercial here in Texas, the State minimum code is IECC 2015. If you're designing for any public projects with the State, it's ASHRAE 90.1 2016. Municipalities will also have their own variations on IECC. Some have adopted codes less stringent than 2015, and have noted they will not enforce the state minimum mandated IECC 2015 code, so take that for what it's worth. If you're outside of a muncipality (ie, county for example), then you defer to the State codes. NEC 2017 and IECC 2015 as your basis of design.

You'll really need to watch the daylighting zones and provide commchecks as required when submitting plans for approval. We've observed the inspectors mostly looking at the commcheck to count fixtures when on site and not so much focus on the control aspect of it.

There's a lot of exceptions and additional requirements in IECC 2015 that can trigger your project so if you're good at interpreting the funny wording to the NEC, you should be familiar with how 'code' language can be tricky. Just remember to look at what subsection you're under and read from top to bottom as some requirements may appear they apply to your project, but in reality, it may be under a section that your project does not have.
Thank you so much for all your replies.

My projects are spread out over the country. In order to be consistent, I am thinking to design to most stringent codes which I think that is Title 24.
 

tw1156

Senior Member
Location
Texas
Thank you so much for all your replies.

My projects are spread out over the country. In order to be consistent, I am thinking to design to most stringent codes which I think that is Title 24.
I would caution you in doing so in that some codes aren't equal. For example, IECC daylighting requirements are not the same as ASHRAE daylighting requirements. IECC has one single daylight zone that requires daylight harvesters, while ASHRAE has a primary and secondary zone for daylighting that would each require their own harvesters. There are other things similar to this, and Title 24 for each and every project sounds like it would be pretty expensive to the owner if it wasn't needed.
 
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