extension cords

Grouch1980

Senior Member
Location
New York, NY
Greetings all.
Is there anything in the NEC that prohibits the use of extension cords with a power strip at a workstation (your typical office desk with computer and convenience receptacles). Sometimes the client would like to plug in an extension cord at the wall outlet in order to use a power strip with more outlets. This is for NYC. Perhaps the NYC amendments say something regarding this?

Thanks!
 

Grouch1980

Senior Member
Location
New York, NY
It is a listing violation to do that.

You can get power strips with longer cords.
iwire, you mean it's against the UL listing of the power strip to use it in this manner? So nothing in the code says you can't, it's just that the installation goes against the UL listing?
 

Grouch1980

Senior Member
Location
New York, NY
The NEC basically stops at the recpt where you plug the power strip or extension cord in the wall.
That makes sense... everything done after the receptacle is per what the client now wants. But is it against the UL listing of the power strip to use it in this fashion? just trying to see what iwire was saying.
 

Grouch1980

Senior Member
Location
New York, NY
It is a listing violation to do that.

You can get power strips with longer cords.
iwire, what do you mean by your 2nd statement? so i understand that it is a listing violation to use power strips, but what do you mean you can get power strips with longer cords? isn't that still a listing violation in this application (using it at desks)?
 

dfmischler

Senior Member
Location
Western NY
Perhaps there is a disconnect on the terminology here. The responses are making a distinction between the extension cord, and the power strip as separate items. Perhaps the OP did not mean it that way, and that is part of the confusion.
 

jumper

Senior Member
I can't agree with that.
Me neither.

90.2 Scope.
(A) Covered. This Code covers the installation of electrical
conductors, equipment, and raceways; signaling and
communications conductors, equipment, and raceways; and
optical fiber cables and raceways for the following:

(3) Installations of conductors and equipment that connect
to the supply of electricity

Equipment. A general term, including fittings, devices, appliances,
luminaires, apparatus, machinery, and the like used as a
part of, or in connection with, an electrical installation.
 

GoldDigger

Moderator
Staff member
dfmischler:
+1.
In some circumstances a power strip plugged into a receptacle outlet can be used to power multiple loads. It is extremely common in computer environments. Some fire authorities may not accept the use of this UL listed product at all, but I think that is less common.
What is almost universally prohibited is:
A. Cascading power strips,
B. Plugging a power strip into an extension cord, and
C. Plugging an extension cord into a power strip.
 

Grouch1980

Senior Member
Location
New York, NY
Perhaps there is a disconnect on the terminology here. The responses are making a distinction between the extension cord, and the power strip as separate items. Perhaps the OP did not mean it that way, and that is part of the confusion.
I see the confusion... what I mean is it a legal installation to have a power strip at a workstation desk. The power strip would plug into a wall outlet (with a cord).
 

al hildenbrand

Senior Member
Location
Minnesota
Occupation
Electrical Contractor, Electrical Consultant, Electrical Engineer
iwire, what do you mean by your 2nd statement? so i understand that it is a listing violation to use power strips, but what do you mean you can get power strips with longer cords?
I believe Bob (iwire) is referring to the passages in the Certifications Directory from UL, commonly known as the White Book. "Power strips" are termed "Relocatable Power Taps". This is part of the 2015 / 16 section for them:
RELOCATABLE POWER TAPS
(XBYS)
USE AND INSTALLATION​
This category covers relocatable power taps rated 250 V ac or less, 20 A or less. They are intended for indoor use to supply power to cord-and-plug-connected electrical utilization equipment.
Relocatable power taps are provided with an attached power-supply cord and attachment plug. The electrical enclosure may be provided with one or more receptacle outlets. Relocatable power taps may also be supplied with up to six lengths of flexible cord not exceeding 1-1/2 feet in length from the main body of the product. Each length may be terminated in a separate single cord connector (receptacle outlet).
Relocatable power taps may be provided with USB (Universal Serial Bus) charging outlets and LED lighting when three or more receptacle outlets are provided.
Relocatable power taps may be provided with fuses or other supplementary overcurrent protection, switches, suppression components and/or indicator lights in any combination, or connections for cable, communications, telephone and/or antenna.

Relocatable power taps are intended to be directly connected to a permanently installed branch-circuit receptacle outlet.

Relocatable power taps are not intended to be series connected (daisy chained) to other relocatable power taps or to extension cords.


Relocatable power taps are not intended for use at construction sites and similar locations.
Relocatable power taps are not intended to be permanently secured to building structures, tables, work benches or similar structures, nor are they intended to be used as a substitute for fixed wiring. The cords of relocatable power taps are not intended to be routed through walls, windows, ceilings, floors or similar openings of buildings.
Relocatable power taps have not been investigated and are not intended for use with general patient care areas or critical patient care areas of health care facilities as defined in Article 517 of ANSI/NFPA 70, ‘‘National Electrical Code.’’
 

petersonra

Senior Member
Location
Northern illinois
Occupation
engineer
Greetings all.
Is there anything in the NEC that prohibits the use of extension cords with a power strip at a workstation (your typical office desk with computer and convenience receptacles). Sometimes the client would like to plug in an extension cord at the wall outlet in order to use a power strip with more outlets. This is for NYC. Perhaps the NYC amendments say something regarding this?

Thanks!
It is not a NEC violation as for practical purposes the NEC stops at the receptacle.
 
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