Fire Alarm voice evac In hotel

bubbarhd

Member
Location
Lynnwood, WA US
Has anybody had difficulty getting audibility and intelligibility voice evacuation system with one speaker in a typical size hotel room? We are concerned about meeting the standard in the bathroom with only one speaker?
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Professional Engineer, Fire & Life Safety
Has anybody had difficulty getting audibility and intelligibility voice evacuation system with one speaker in a typical size hotel room? We are concerned about meeting the standard in the bathroom with only one speaker?
With the product offerings available from all the major players you shouldn't have any issue getting intelligibility in a bathroom, unless you can't tap down to 1/8 watt. Anything higher is likely to create a nasty echo. For the main room, again, 1/8 watt should be plenty, and certainly not more than 1/4 watt. Unless we're talking about bathrooms with Olympic-sized jacuzzis, of course.
 

PaulMmn

Senior Member
Location
Union, KY, USA
Has anybody had difficulty getting audibility and intelligibility voice evacuation system with one speaker in a typical size hotel room? We are concerned about meeting the standard in the bathroom with only one speaker?
Are you talking about 1 speaker in the room being heard through the bathroom door? Without a separate speaker in the bathroom??
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Professional Engineer, Fire & Life Safety
Are you talking about 1 speaker in the room being heard through the bathroom door? Without a separate speaker in the bathroom??
You know, I didn't read it that way. :slaphead: IFF that's the case, then you will definitely not meet the intelligibility requirements if the notification appliance is in the main room and the occupant is in the bathroom with the door closed.
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Professional Engineer, Fire & Life Safety
How do you guys verify audibility/intelligibility requirement? Are you using software? tables? rule of thumb? scientific guess?
See Annex D for acceptable test methods. Most commonly, it's the AHJ walking around and saying "push it up in this area" or "a little too loud here". And that's fine by NFPA 72.
 

victor.cherkashi

Senior Member
Location
NYC, NY
See Annex D for acceptable test methods. Most commonly, it's the AHJ walking around and saying "push it up in this area" or "a little too loud here". And that's fine by NFPA 72.
The method you're describing assuming you already have installed speakers and you're adjusting them in field. My question was for design phase, how to prevent additional work after project is finished if a speaker in adjacent room doesn't produce enough DB (or it's appear a door is thick and absorbing too much DB). I use rule of thumb: I assume a speaker is not required in small room/space if there already speaker in adjacent room.
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Professional Engineer, Fire & Life Safety
The method you're describing assuming you already have installed speakers and you're adjusting them in field. My question was for design phase, how to prevent additional work after project is finished if a speaker in adjacent room doesn't produce enough DB (or it's appear a door is thick and absorbing too much DB). I use rule of thumb: I assume a speaker is not required in small room/space if there already speaker in adjacent room.
If there is a door that can close between those spaces, you'll never meet the audibility/intelligibility requirements. On the other hand, NFPA 72 in Section 24.4.1.2.2.4 specifically exempts certain areas from having to have intelligible voice. Design accordingly.
 
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