Is this a legit install ?

texie

Senior Member
Location
Fort Collins, Colorado
Occupation
Electrician, Contractor, Inspector
The city water pressure in my area runs about 90-110 PSI so a PRV is a must for us to keep it around 65 PSI.
I should have added that we are also required to have a double check valve along with the PRV at the meter. So an expansion tank is a must.
 

GoldDigger

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Placerville, CA, USA
Occupation
Retired PV System Designer
The city water pressure in my area runs about 90-110 PSI so a PRV is a must for us to keep it around 65 PSI.
Similar for me. In fact there is one pressure regulator downstream of my main valve after the meter and another for the interior plumbing of the house.
Long lines for irrigation in an acre+ property benefit from a higher pressure that the house uses, but not so high as to blow out my PVC pipe runs.

High main pressures are very common in hilly country. I am at 2400 feet elevation in the CA foothills.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Similar for me. In fact there is one pressure regulator downstream of my main valve after the meter and another for the interior plumbing of the house.
Long lines for irrigation in an acre+ property benefit from a higher pressure that the house uses, but not so high as to blow out my PVC pipe runs.

High main pressures are very common in hilly country. I am at 2400 feet elevation in the CA foothills.
If you are on a municipal or rural water system and you are at a low elevation point compared to some the highest points in the system, yes.

If you are on your own or some local well you probably at whatever pressure your system set up to run at, and likely is 60 psi or less on most small domestic water systems, and possibly even varies according to usage demands.
 

don_resqcapt19

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Illinois
Occupation
retired electrician
PRVs, back flow preventers and expansion tanks for water heaters are not used around here. Typical city pressure is 50 to 80 PSI depending on where you are at in the town. The only back flow preventers are on fire sprinkler connections to the city supply and on industrial supply connections, but not on the typical domestic water connection. All outside faucets are required to have vacuum breakers. The city does have some PRVs in their distribution system to account for the elevation changes across the city. Around 100' from highest to lowest. As I recall that is about 0.433 PSI per foot, so around 43 PSI for the elevation change.

A town about 15 miles away probably requires PRVs in some parts of the town as there are places where the pressure at a fire hydrant is around 115 PSI.
 
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