M. Stevens ground screw?

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iwire

Moderator
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Location
Massachusetts
Unless I had a lot of sheet metal to tap I can not see me buying those.

I never like all in one tools, IMO you pay more for less results.
 

mdshunk

Senior Member
Location
Right here.
iwire said:
Unless I had a lot of sheet metal to tap I can not see me buying those.

I never like all in one tools, IMO you pay more for less results.
They really come into their own if you're building a panel. Center punch all your marks and go to town. I had to build a small contactor and timer panel last week for a bunch of truck block heaters, and I estimate I saved 2 minutes and 14 seconds. :wink: No, seriously, these are one of those things that appears novel but really is a slick tool. They don't really break unless you are drill-tapping at a weird angle or if you're attempting to do something thicker than the typical thickness of a box or backpanel.
 

electricalperson

Senior Member
Location
massachusetts
Dennis Alwon said:
Are you like one of those Bulls in a China shop?:D You need to be gentle....:D
i usually break tons of drill bits and i go through screwdrivers like there going out of style. i used to ruin one pair of linesmens on a monthly basis but i stopped using them as a hammer/chisel/nail cutters and stopped letting helpers borrow them since they dont own the proper voltage testers:)

one tool i broke that i never replaced was that klein 6 in one tap tool or whatever it was. used it once to tap a 6/32 hole and it snapped like a twig
 

frizbeedog

Senior Member
Location
Oregon
mdshunk said:
That would be okay for truck stock, but if you're doing a job where you've had a bit to think about the run(s), buying the right one's can save a ton of time. If I'm doing an all PVC job sight-unseen, I'll still show up with some FSC, FSS and FSE type boxes in 1/2 and 3/4. That will cover 90% of most small things I run into. Naturally, I still take some "no hole" boxes along for the weird things.
Yea, I was thinking mostly truck stock. But when you have to plug an unused opening in one of the hubs, do they make a plug for that or is it a short stub and a pvc cap?
 

mdshunk

Senior Member
Location
Right here.
electricalperson said:
i usually break tons of drill bits and i go through screwdrivers like there going out of style. i used to ruin one pair of linesmens on a monthly basis but i stopped using them as a hammer/chisel/nail cutters and stopped letting helpers borrow them since they dont own the proper voltage testers:)

one tool i broke that i never replaced was that klein 6 in one tap tool or whatever it was. used it once to tap a 6/32 hole and it snapped like a twig
I'm sure there's a 12-step program for a guy like you. It sounds like you've got an expensive habit. Curious... are you an employee or a contractor? Does your employer get you a new one of whatever your turned in broken? I'm not asking to pick on you. I'm asking to explore the potential limits of an employer's generosity for my own information.
 

electricalperson

Senior Member
Location
massachusetts
mdshunk said:
They really come into their own if you're building a panel. Center punch all your marks and go to town. I had to build a small contactor and timer panel last week for a bunch of truck block heaters, and I estimate I saved 2 minutes and 14 seconds. :wink: No, seriously, these are one of those things that appears novel but really is a slick tool. They don't really break unless you are drill-tapping at a weird angle or if you're attempting to do something thicker than the typical thickness of a box or backpanel.
i broke mine trying to drill/tap a steel testing chamber to mount a limit switch for an interlock. the steel was probably an inch thick :D
 

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
mdshunk said:
They really come into their own if you're building a panel.
No doubt, but I am as likely to be blind tapping 1" as tapping sheet metal.

This will probably make people cringe but I have been known to use tek screws to assemble panels.
 

mdshunk

Senior Member
Location
Right here.
frizbeedog said:
But when you have to plug an unused opening in one of the hubs, do they make a plug for that or is it a short stub and a pvc cap?
Can't say that I've ever had to do that in a long time. Mostly reworking existing work, and yeah, that's what I do. Cut the conduit off that won't be used short, and cap it. I'd never, ever, do this for a new install. Double-ugly and DIYish.
 

electricalperson

Senior Member
Location
massachusetts
mdshunk said:
I'm sure there's a 12-step program for a guy like you. It sounds like you've got an expensive habit. Curious... are you an employee or a contractor? Does your employer get you a new one of whatever your turned in broken? I'm not asking to pick on you. I'm asking to explore the potential limits of an employer's generosity for my own information.
i work for a contractor. i replace all my tools that i break. ive been good latley i havnt broken any tools since i recently bought a crowbar to use to pry instead of a greenlee screwdriver.
 

mdshunk

Senior Member
Location
Right here.
iwire said:
This will probably make people cringe but I have been known to use tek screws to assemble panels.
I think there can be a good arguement to be made for using the wafer-head Tek screws to put in DIN rail. I'd rather have a real machine thread to hold in contactors, for no other reason than making replacement easier.
 

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
mdshunk said:
I think there can be a good arguement to be made for using the wafer-head Tek screws to put in DIN rail.
If I only had a close up picture, I could show you that very thing on the last panel I put together. :cool:

I can't say that your wrong about the easier replacement but I like the easier installation more.

Have you run into the perforated back planes? They are pretty slick, no drilling or tapping required, but IMO the weight of the objects you attach to it can not be to much.
 

mdshunk

Senior Member
Location
Right here.
iwire said:
Have you run into the perforated back planes? They are pretty slick, no drilling or tapping required, but IMO the weight of the objects you attach to it can not be to much.
No, never seen such. I have, on occasion, used a piece of plywood, in leiu of the regular manufacturer's backplate, for quick and dirty work.
 

mdshunk

Senior Member
Location
Right here.
iwire said:
I can't say that your wrong about the easier replacement but I like the easier installation more.
I guess, but I suppose I fall somewhere in the middle. A tradeoff between easy/quick installation, with a realization that somebody's got to work on the thing one day.
 

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
mdshunk said:
No, never seen such.
I have not been able to order it but I run into it in "Hill-Phoenix" pre-made electrical cabinets. (POD electric rooms, refrigeration control cabinets, etc.)

The entire back plane is full of holes that take a #10 SMS perfectly.
 

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
mdshunk said:
I guess, but I suppose I fall somewhere in the middle. A tradeoff between easy/quick installation, with a realization that somebody's got to work on the thing one day.
It's not like I used a nut and bolt, you must have run into that before. :mad:
 

mdshunk

Senior Member
Location
Right here.
iwire said:
I have not been able to order it but I run into it in "Hill-Phoenix" pre-made electrical cabinets. (POD electric rooms, refrigeration control cabinets, etc.)

The entire back plane is full of holes that take a #10 SMS perfectly.
Hmmm... are those back panels orange in color? Starting to ring a bell now, maybe, if they're orange.
 

chris kennedy

Senior Member
Location
Miami Fla.
Occupation
60 yr old tool twisting electrician
iwire said:
It's not like I used a nut and bolt, you must have run into that before. :mad:
LOL...Yup. Those 12 guys at the shop that don't have NFPA 70 still build em like that.
 

LarryFine

Master Electrician Electric Contractor Richmond VA
Location
Henrico County, VA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
chris kennedy said:
Do you use these and have you noticed that if you try to land a #12 solid EGC in these the box strips before the desired torque is reached?
I agree, and I also hate the boxes you have to attach mounting tabs to the back of with equally-crummy little tapping screws.
 
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