new ridiculous CA law for 2014

LEO2854

Esteemed Member
Location
Ma
for all you contractors who do residential work california.I think it's time you may want to turn in your license and go Under ground. It seems that in the infinite wisdom of the California legislation we have a new law that requires upon any permit any final from any permits of a single family residence all non water-saving faucets toilets shower heads in the entire house must be upgraded to low flow. Do you really think that somebody pulling a permit for a circuit or some outlets is going to want to spend thousands upgrading their entire plumbing system In their house.
http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=200920100SB407
And how did we become plumbers?:blink:



:lol:
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
we don't need snow... when it firsts rains after a dry spell, the streets are really slick till they get washed off...
and the st00pid californicators have ten car pile ups, well, cause they are st00pid.

i've offroaded a lot, and you learn to drive in some serious slop, but in 1999, i spent december in fort wayne,
and i figured that the local people would have snow driving *down*. nope. it was freaking scary watching people
blow past you at 50 mph on these little two lane roads, and you can feel your drive wheels keep breaking loose
on patches of ice at 30 mph.

the part i didn't get, is that in indiana, studs and chains are illegal, BECAUSE THEY ARE HARD ON THE ROADS.
i had a pair of chains with me, 'cause everyone in LA has them 'cause when it snows on cajon pass, they
WON'T LET YOU PAST THE CHP CHECKPOINT WITHOUT CHAINS.

everyone in LA has chains, but no snow or water. indiana has all this snow, and chains are illegal.

and i thought california was batchit crazy.
Yes, there are a lot of people that are too comfortable with handling - especially with front wheel or four wheel drive vehicles. They often handle very well in slick conditions, but what those people often forget is it still takes some distance to stop, and they get into trouble when they need to make a sudden stop. Those first rain effects after a dry spell happen pretty much everywhere, but are much more temporary than a snow packed road.
 

Lectricbota

Senior Member
Van should start when it's 10 degrees! That could (possibly) keep you from work for quite a prolonged period of time in the tri-state area. You need a new battery:thumbsup:.
I'm not even going to try and start the truck today. Had planned to take the kids on a short hike (-2 miles) to the pond for a little ice-fishing - but we're gonna scrap that plan also and just stay inside.

Wind chill is down to -49
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I'm not even going to try and start the truck today. Had planned to take the kids on a short hike (-2 miles) to the pond for a little ice-fishing - but we're gonna scrap that plan also and just stay inside.

Wind chill is down to -49
Good decision, a hike of only 200 feet sounds miserable in those conditions.
 

PetrosA

Senior Member
I wouldn't even want to let my dog out to go to the bathroom in those conditions.
My German Shepherd or the St. Bernard I took care of for a year would have loved -49. Our Rhodesian Ridgeback did NOT like cold, or freezing rain, and in spite of looking like a steroid gulping, weight lifting, special forces training beast, he would tiptoe out till his nose felt the rain and high-tail it back into the house like a total wuss ;)
 

Fulthrotl

~~Please excuse the mess. Sig under construction~~
And how did we become plumbers?:blink:



:lol:
the same way i became a painter yesterday?

i set out to spray primer with a 4 stage Accuspray HVLP.
i've sprayed a lot of stuff with this, including some latex with
"built in primer" for a friend. it had the consistency of stucco.

and this sprayer kicks butt. yesterday, it kicked mine.

i've never had any overspray or airborne paint with this unit, ever.
to the extent that you are almost tempted not to bother with a respirator.

well, this waterbased 1 part epoxy changed all that. it flashed, and
distributed a thick layer of white epoxy dust over EVERYTHING.
i've never seen anything like it.

to duplicate the effect, all you would need is a pound of talc,
a leaf blower, and a seven year old to operate it.. in your living room..

thank god it didn't stick.

now, having mastered painting, i'm ready to rock on the plumbing....
where are those faucet thingys you wanted put in? right next to the paint
cans in the garage....?

no problem.
 

Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
.

the part i didn't get, is that in indiana, studs and chains are illegal, BECAUSE THEY ARE HARD ON THE ROADS.
i had a pair of chains with me,

indiana has all this snow, and chains are illegal.

and i thought california was batchit crazy.

Who says chains are illegal in Indiana?

You just make this up!
 

GoldDigger

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Placerville, CA, USA
Occupation
Retired PV System Designer
Who says chains are illegal in Indiana?

You just make this up!
In most areas it is not legal to put on or keep on chains in areas where there is no snow on the road.
The driver's motivation should be that they are limiting their speed and putting a lot of wear on the tires and the chains by keeping them on when not needed, but if they want to be stupid, the state will step in to preserve the roads.
 

Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
In most areas it is not legal to put on or keep on chains in areas where there is no snow on the road.
The driver's motivation should be that they are limiting their speed and putting a lot of wear on the tires and the chains by keeping them on when not needed, but if they want to be stupid, the state will step in to preserve the roads.
Don't know where you get your info from. You and Full seem to be full of it. Even by California Law you may have sudded tires on your car in winter.
 

Fulthrotl

~~Please excuse the mess. Sig under construction~~
Who says chains are illegal in Indiana?

You just make this up!
no, actually, i didn't.
that was my understanding of the indiana vehicle code in 1999,
when i was there during december.

the person i was staying with told me this, a police officer told me
this, and the fact that none of the cars on the roadways had chains
led me to believe them, and none of the cars stuck in ditches on
the side of the road had them, either.

at some point between then, and now, the law was changed to
reflect common sense, and now is written thusly:

http://www.in.gov/legislative/ic/code/title9/ar19/ch18.html

i hope this misinformation i provided didn't adversely affect your
winter plans. please drive carefully.
 

sandsnow

Senior Member
I guess it's only fair that the electricians have to become plumbers if the roofers have to become electricians>

SMO K E D E T E C T O R A N D C A R B O N M O N O X I D E A L A R M R E Q U I R E M E N T S F O R R E - R O O F I N G P E R M I T

The 2010 California Building Code (CBC) and the 2010 California Residential Code (CRC), effective on January 1, 2011, require smoke detectors (Code
references: CBC Sections 907.2.11.5 and CRC Section R314) and carbon monoxide alarms (Code references: CBC Sections 420.4 and CRC Section
R315) to be installed in prescribed locations as part of a permitted residential construction project valued at $1,000 or more
 

Fulthrotl

~~Please excuse the mess. Sig under construction~~
I guess it's only fair that the electricians have to become plumbers if the roofers have to become electricians>

SMO K E D E T E C T O R A N D C A R B O N M O N O X I D E A L A R M R E Q U I R E M E N T S F O R R E - R O O F I N G P E R M I T

The 2010 California Building Code (CBC) and the 2010 California Residential Code (CRC), effective on January 1, 2011, require smoke detectors (Code
references: CBC Sections 907.2.11.5 and CRC Section R314) and carbon monoxide alarms (Code references: CBC Sections 420.4 and CRC Section
R315) to be installed in prescribed locations as part of a permitted residential construction project valued at $1,000 or more
there is that new general contractor classification that just took effect the first of the year....

instead of B-1 for general contractor, there is a HD-####, which is awarded to people who
stand in the home depot parking lot and solicit work.... the #### is the number of the home
depot that they regularly frequent.... the guy who cleaned out my back yard license was
License # HD-6646. he's $100 a day, plus lunch.

he can do your plumbing fixtures, smoke detectors, paint the living room, and put those
can lights in for you.

note: the A contractors are a different licensing category. they are easy to identify in the
HD parking lot. they are the ones with shovels.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LuQUUqCc-EI
 
Last edited:

LEO2854

Esteemed Member
Location
Ma
the same way i became a painter yesterday?

i set out to spray primer with a 4 stage Accuspray HVLP.
i've sprayed a lot of stuff with this, including some latex with
"built in primer" for a friend. it had the consistency of stucco.

and this sprayer kicks butt. yesterday, it kicked mine.

i've never had any overspray or airborne paint with this unit, ever.
to the extent that you are almost tempted not to bother with a respirator.

well, this waterbased 1 part epoxy changed all that. it flashed, and
distributed a thick layer of white epoxy dust over EVERYTHING.
i've never seen anything like it.

to duplicate the effect, all you would need is a pound of talc,
a leaf blower, and a seven year old to operate it.. in your living room..

thank god it didn't stick.

now, having mastered painting, i'm ready to rock on the plumbing....
where are those faucet thingys you wanted put in? right next to the paint
cans in the garage....?

no problem.
Good work.:thumbsup:
 

Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
I guess it's only fair that the electricians have to become plumbers if the roofers have to become electricians>

SMO K E D E T E C T O R A N D C A R B O N M O N O X I D E A L A R M R E Q U I R E M E N T S F O R R E - R O O F I N G P E R M I T

The 2010 California Building Code (CBC) and the 2010 California Residential Code (CRC), effective on January 1, 2011, require smoke detectors (Code
references: CBC Sections 907.2.11.5 and CRC Section R314) and carbon monoxide alarms (Code references: CBC Sections 420.4 and CRC Section
R315) to be installed in prescribed locations as part of a permitted residential construction project valued at $1,000 or more
I know it can be screwed up , but how difficult is it to install or plug in a CO detector. The inspector can easily verify that.

Installing a Toilet can be easy , but what if it leaks. The EC's insurance will not pay.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
and none of the cars stuck in ditches on
the side of the road had them, either.
If they had chains they likely would not have been stuck in the ditch:)

Even if legal I doubt you would find many with chains in most midwestern states, unless they plan to be plowing snow with the chained vehicle or plan to be on less traveled roads maybe. You certainly do not want to drive at high speeds with chains, front wheel and four wheel drive vehicles do not have as much of a need for chains and deep snow is usually a problem even if you have chains.

When my dad was driving truck all over the country the only times he put on chains were in mountain areas - and was usually required or you are not allowed through.
 

ramsy

Owner/Operator
Location
LA basin, CA
Occupation
Service Electrician 2017 NEC
After attending my local IAEI presentation on CA Title 20/24 non-residential energy codes, I believe the software-expert system subscription is going to be needed to follow the complexity of calculation options & exceptions.

Further, litigation challenges in the TI sectors neer 10k Sq.Ft are anticipated, which may resemble another enforcement train wreck on the horizon.
 

sandsnow

Senior Member
After attending my local IAEI presentation on CA Title 20/24 non-residential energy codes, I believe the software-expert system subscription is going to be needed to follow the complexity of calculation options & exceptions.

Further, litigation challenges in the TI sectors neer 10k Sq.Ft are anticipated, which may resemble another enforcement train wreck on the horizon.
Was that by John Bush from Leviton at the Santa Ana Elks Lodge? He gave a presentation for us and he was good.

Any more specific info on legal challenges?
 

Fulthrotl

~~Please excuse the mess. Sig under construction~~
a little more of an update...... the world hasn't ended.... yet.

a little more of an update...... the world hasn't ended.... yet.

got an email from CSLB today:

"January 17, 2014CSLB #14-01
CSLB Clarifies New Law Requiring Replacement of Plumbing Fixtures
Building permits issued for property maintenance and repairs does not trigger new requirements
SACRAMENTO ? To dispel confusion over the new state Civil Code law (Senate Bill 407, 2009) that became effective January 1, 2014, for replacement of outdated plumbing fixtures with water-saving models, the Contractors State License Board (CSLB) offers the following clarification for contractors.
The new law requires anyone applying for a building permit that will alter or improve a single-family residence built in 1994 or earlier to replace all plumbing fixtures with water-saving designs. Replacement is a condition of receiving final permit approval from a local building department. The law also requires, by 2019, water-conserving plumbing fixtures in multi-family dwellings or commercial properties when specific renovations are made.
Although not a legal opinion, the California Building Officials (CALBO) group has interpreted ?alterations? or ?improvements? to mean any construction to an existing structure that enhances or improves the structure. Construction that is related to repairs or maintenance of the structure is not considered to be an alteration or improvement.
Following is a list of permit types that CALBO considers to be repair or maintenance, and do not trigger the requirements of SB 407:
? Electrical service change out
? HVAC change out
? Re-roofing
? Sewer line replacement
? Siding or stucco
? Site work: retaining walls, fences, walkways, etc.
? Water heater replacement
? Window replacement
? Other repairs as determined by the state Building Code

It is feared that property owners and licensed contractors who misunderstand the law may end up paying for new fixtures that are not required, or may avoid pulling building permits altogether to avoid the possible triggers to SB 407.
Since this is not a legal opinion, CSLB encourages licensed contractors to verify requirements with their local building department before taking any action on a project."
 
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