NFPA 99 3-4.2.2.1 generator application

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anbm

Senior Member
My ? Is regarding generator installation for a type 1 nursing facility... My customer is requesting installation of a generator to supply there whole facility. After performing a power study I found they will need a 450KW unit and a 1200amp service entrance rated ATS and distribution panel for various loads. DADS keep telling me that I need to follow the NFPA 99 3-4.2.2.1 2000 edition which requires separation of life safety, critical and equipment loads over 150kva. That's fine however my customer wants to run the complete facility and not just these loads. What are the requirements for separating these loads and additional ats gear. It does not make sense to install 1 ATS feeding the whole facility then install additional ATS gear for the emergency loads... Please advise or point out the code for NFPA 70, 99 or 110 which would explain this situation. Thank you!
Why they want to use generator to back up the whole facility? Go beyond code requirement???
Why not using (2) generators feed the whole facility through ATSs and get rid of normal service? (-:
 

hillbilly1

Senior Member
Location
Atlanta,Ga
Why they want to use generator to back up the whole facility? Go beyond code requirement???
Why not using (2) generators feed the whole facility through ATSs and get rid of normal service? (-:
One generator can be used, it just will have to have two or more output breakers for the multiple transfer switches required. The generator will also have to meet the more stringent requirements of a life safety system.
 
Why they want to use generator to back up the whole facility? Go beyond code requirement???
Why not using (2) generators feed the whole facility through ATSs and get rid of normal service? (-:
Their purpose is to operate at 100% efficiency upon power outages. This customer has requested to the state to accept vent patients and just wants his operation to go over flawlessly. He has actually inquired about going with two gens strictly due to the amount if work that needs to be done within the facility. His true emergency loads do not meet the 150kva rating.
 
One generator can be used, it just will have to have two or more output breakers for the multiple transfer switches required. The generator will also have to meet the more stringent requirements of a life safety system.

Thank you for your input.... The customer does not have but three options... Separate his loads within their building to meet code requirements, install a second gen which will be less then the 150kva rating or scratch the idea to involve vent (critical care) patients to his facility. I believe for the moment he will utilize the genset that is in operation at the moment and add necessary loads for new clients.
 
Why 2000 version when 2012 is out?

Your reference of 3-4.2.2.1 does not correspond to anything in the 2012 version. Are you sure this is correct?
I will need to go back and view this info... "DADS State Inspector provided me with this section article. I believe I have been replying to the comments incorrectly and hope you guys have seen you've shed the light on the situation! Thank you!
 

steve66

Senior Member
Roger I appreciate you pointing out these articles. As I am only a supplier and service tech for installed systems from residential to commercial/commercial mobile to industrial applications including parallel units up to but not limited to 4.5 megawatts. I have an electrical contractor providing a bid for installation and of course my reasoning for this forum is to point out the actual articles relating to a 100% operating level 1 facility.
IMO, this should be designed by an engineer, and he/she should be answering your questions.

If you do in fact have life safety or critical branches, you should probably also take a look at NFPA 110 - Standard for Emergency and Standby Power Systems.

Steve
 

roger

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Fl
Occupation
Electrician
Roger you've been a great help amonst the others! I appreciate your time you've vested in my question and interest! Thank you!
You're welcome Scott and

IMO, this should be designed by an engineer, and he/she should be answering your questions.

If you do in fact have life safety or critical branches, you should probably also take a look at NFPA 110 - Standard for Emergency and Standby Power Systems.

Steve
I agree with Steve as far as getting down to the real world answer.

Roger
 
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