Pvc Repair Cheet ?

Status
Not open for further replies.

Jerseydaze

Senior Member
Heres the situation I have .I have a broken coupling on an existing 2"Sch 40 PVC that is surface mounted on the outside of a house is there any pretty way to fix this other then pull out old wiring and pull it back in?
 
There is a product available that can be used to fix this without pulling the wiring out. It will not be a pretty final solution, as it is mostly used for underground installations.
I believer the product is made by Carlon, check their website for the product.
 

blue spark

Senior Member
Location
MN
Jerseydaze said:
2"Sch 40 PVC that is surface mounted on the outside of a house
Pierre, am I incorrect? I guess I was assuming this is exposed. There's that "A" word again.
:wink:
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
Even if there was an approved method, how do you plan on getting the old coupling off?
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
mivey said:
Anticipating some problems?

A broken coupling that's been glued to the conduit would be a problem if you were trying a repair without removing the conductors first. That seems to be what Jersey is trying to do.
 

mivey

Senior Member
infinity said:
A broken coupling that's been glued to the conduit would be a problem if you were trying a repair without removing the conductors first. That seems to be what Jersey is trying to do.
You would certainly have to be careful.
 

peter

Senior Member
Location
San Diego
First of all, the coupling was not solidly glued on. That is, the pipe and coupling was not treated with primer prior to the application of the glue itself. Therefore, you should find that the broken coupling should be fairly easy to chip off in large chunks. Use a sharp carpenter's wood chisel I know electricians are forbidden to have sharp chisels but this time cheat.
In any event, if this is feeding an outdoor panel, the proper procedure would be to disconnect the cables inside the panel or meter box. You may want to have the power company disconnect the power first. Unbolt the box from the wall. Disassemble the pipe and, as suggested, replace with heavier schedule 80. Note: this may be a violation of the rule about pulling wire into a completely installed piping system. But this falls into the category asked in the thread about "Which rules do you ignore?". Just lie about it.
An el cheapo alternative would be to take a new coupling and hacksaw it down the middle. Pack the cut edges with plenty of glue with a matching color. You may want to even use blue masking tape to confine the mess. When dry, lightly finish with a file. Of course, the cut lines should parallel the wall. Perhaps add another support behind or near the joint so it won't happen again.
Paint the whole thing to match the house.
Why did it break anyway?
~Peter

Peeetttttteeeeeerrrrr
 

hardworkingstiff

Senior Member
Location
Wilmington, NC
peter said:
Why did it break anyway?
~Peter

Peeetttttteeeeeerrrrr
I think Peter has asked an important question. If you don't address the cause of the break, then IMO you have not dealt with the problem, just the symptom. Is the pipe run long enough that it needs an expansion coupling?
 

blue spark

Senior Member
Location
MN
LarryFine said:
Why are you both suggesting using sched. 80? Not every service is subject to damage.
Well, I did say in my post that I was assuming. However if it's above grade and it's a PVC service, then it's schedule 80. Always has been, always will be.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
blue spark said:
However if it's above grade and it's a PVC service, then it's schedule 80. Always has been, always will be.

Not around here. Many services are SE cable. SCH 40 is fine if not subject to damage which for residential most services aren't.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top