Section 210.70 Change

Dennis Alwon

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Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
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Electrical Contractor
It is probably not an issue but many threads in the past stated that there was no where in the nec that required a switch to be in the room or near the room that it controlled. Well, that has finally changed

210.70(A)(1) Habitable Rooms.
At least one lighting outlet controlled by a listed wall-mounted control device shall be installed in every habitable room, kitchen, and bathroom. The wall-mounted control device shall be located near an entrance to the room on a wall.
Exception No. 1: In other than kitchens and bathrooms, one or more receptacles controlled by a listed wall-mounted control device shall be permitted in lieu of lighting outlets.
Exception No. 2: Lighting outlets shall be permitted to be controlled by occupancy sensors that are (1) in addition to listed wall-mounted control devices or (2) located at a customary wall switch location and equipped with a manual override that will allow the sensor to function as a wall switch
I wonder if they will soon require an outdoor light to be switched near the door where the light is illuminating.
 

Dennis Alwon

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Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Code said "in" the room

Now "near" an entrance
The code never said the switch had to be in the room. The light fixture needs to be in there but never has there been a requirement for the switch to be in the room.

I believe the state of Washington has a rule that bathroom switches must be installed outside the bathroom.
 

infinity

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Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
More ambiguous nonsense. Who is going to define what near means. I'm really starting to loathe the people responsible for these code changes. Was the previous code requirement really a problem? :mad:
 

shortcircuit2

Senior Member
Location
South of Bawstin
The code never said the switch had to be in the room. The light fixture needs to be in there but never has there been a requirement for the switch to be in the room.
I see your point.

And the new language still does not specify "in" the room.

The AHJ will determine "near"...

I suppose if the language were more specific...one could say the NEC is a design manual.
 

infinity

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Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
I see your point.

And the new language still does not specify "in" the room.

The AHJ will determine "near"...

I suppose if the language were more specific...one could say the NEC is a design manual.
Receptacles have to spaced at certain intervals and heights IMO that doesn't make the NEC a design manual. Is one supposed to call the AHJ every time they install a switch?
 

stevenje

Senior Member
Location
Yachats Oregon
Receptacles have to spaced at certain intervals and heights IMO that doesn't make the NEC a design manual. Is one supposed to call the AHJ every time they install a switch?
How about something as simple as " the wall switch need to be installed within "X" number of feet or inches from the opening side of the door jamb. Maybe throw in a height requirement/restriction.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
How about something as simple as " the wall switch need to be installed within "X" number of feet or inches from the opening side of the door jamb. Maybe throw in a height requirement/restriction.
Yes that's what I was thinking. There are maximum distances all over the NEC which makes installation and inspection easier when things are black and white. Could you imagine if the NEC said NM cable shall be secured near each box? :rolleyes:
 

charlie b

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Location
Seattle, WA
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Electrical Engineer
I believe the state of Washington has a rule that bathroom switches must be installed outside the bathroom.
If that were true, the requirement would appear in Chapter 296-46B of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC). It does not. It may be required in some states, but WA is not among them. I have stayed at places where that is the standard configuration, including some hotels in some foreign countries. I don't like it. If you have to use the bathroom in the middle of the night, turning the bathroom light on with the door open will disturb your sleeping partner.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
Code said "in" the room

Now "near" an entrance
Previous code(s) mentioned wall switch controls for basically same habitable spaces, but never specified where to place the switch. Nothing prohibited having a switch for a third floor bedroom in a basement level room, but a wall switch control was still required. Now it says that third floor bedroom switch must be near an entrance to the room. Also as I read it it basically is saying at least one lighting outlet in said room must have switch near an entrance. You could still have switches for additional lighting elsewhere or even use pull chains on the luminaire.
 

Dennis Alwon

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Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
If that were true, the requirement would appear in Chapter 296-46B of the Washington Administrative Code (WAC). It does not. It may be required in some states, but WA is not among them. I have stayed at places where that is the standard configuration, including some hotels in some foreign countries. I don't like it. If you have to use the bathroom in the middle of the night, turning the bathroom light on with the door open will disturb your sleeping partner.
Sorry Charlie I thought someone from Washington stated that awhile ago. I must have gotten that wrong. I am doing alot of that lately.
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Location
-
Occupation
Engineer/Technician
I did an addition last year that had a pocket door next to a corner. Kind of hard to get the switch for the room IN the room
 

Coppersmith

Senior Member
Location
Tampa, FL, USA
I did an addition last year that had a pocket door next to a corner. Kind of hard to get the switch for the room IN the room
Just had that same problem. Used a Casita remote switch on the wall over the pocket door. In this case it was a three-way switch, but there is no reason one couldn't hide the three-way main switch (not use it) and treat it like a single switch.
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Location
-
Occupation
Engineer/Technician
There are pocket door kits for 6" studs-- allows you to use a skinny box on either side of the sliding door.
Hit like instead of reply. I did like the post, but I didn’t like it, if you know what I mean...
I really wish they would take the like stuff away. Reminds me of my wife on her Facebook crap...

anyway... we had 3 1/2“ walls. That wasn’t an option..
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Location
-
Occupation
Engineer/Technician
Just had that same problem. Used a Casita remote switch on the wall over the pocket door. In this case it was a three-way switch, but there is no reason one couldn't hide the three-way main switch (not use it) and treat it like a single switch.
What the heck, I liked this one also...

this is what I like here, I learn something every day. Had no idea that was an option...
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I did an addition last year that had a pocket door next to a corner. Kind of hard to get the switch for the room IN the room
New wording does not give any specific distances, just says "near an entrance". Kind of leaves the distance up to AHJ's. Reasonable AHJ's will recognize certain difficulties and allow some variances at times.
 
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