Settle the debate

Status
Not open for further replies.

76nemo

Senior Member
Location
Ogdensburg, NY
For the few resi's I have roped, I leave the NM jacket intack through the load center until it's paralleled with the circuits coinciding breaker, then strip it out. I had someone tell me that was not legit. He said the jacket had to be stripped once it entered the panel. I told him his pants were on backwards. He couldn't quote the exact violation, and I can't find it in the '05. He swears he's right.

Who wins????
 

resistance

Senior Member
Location
WA
If you are asking if the sheathing needs to be stripped before entering the panel, then I say: You can do whatever you want in this case, and he can do the same. Unless you have a local code saying otherwise, tell him to mind his own business! Hopefully I'm reading your question correctly.
 

76nemo

Senior Member
Location
Ogdensburg, NY
I say no violation.

Was it one of these guys?


I wouldn't put him in that category. I asked if he had some issue with letting the conductors breathe a little more. This was a 40 circuit panel with many overkill dedicated circuits. It was a smaller home. He swore it wasn't legit. I remained polite and asked him to quote it. He is pretty sharp, but he does commercial installations, along with industrial.

I am not a construction guy, especially resi,. because of that I felt like I hadn't had both feet to stand on, but I've been through code books on all aspects. I wanted to ask this question here because you guys are the pro's with construction. Guess I'll have to wait for him to quote the violation, (if there is one:roll:). He is a friend, but I think he's wrong:cool:
 

76nemo

Senior Member
Location
Ogdensburg, NY
You win.

But quit it.

That has to look like hell :grin:

On the flip side, he said it looked great. I am done now, but it was for a friends in-law. I could go back and snap a pic. Hey Buster, you said you were a production worker on another forum, didn't you? Just busting your chops. I am one of those guys you or many bosses would bust me for spending too much time in a panel:grin:
 

Volta

Senior Member
Location
Columbus, Ohio
While there may or may not be some semantic wiggle room for "outlet, junction, and switch point", I hope you leave (at least) 6" of free conductor. 300.14. ;)
 

acrwc10

Senior Member
I wouldn't put him in that category. I asked if he had some issue with letting the conductors breathe a little more. This was a 40 circuit panel with many overkill dedicated circuits. It was a smaller home. He swore it wasn't legit. I remained polite and asked him to quote it. He is pretty sharp, but he does commercial installations, along with industrial.

I am not a construction guy, especially resi,. because of that I felt like I hadn't had both feet to stand on, but I've been through code books on all aspects. I wanted to ask this question here because you guys are the pro's with construction. Guess I'll have to wait for him to quote the violation, (if there is one:roll:). He is a friend, but I think he's wrong:cool:
Don't hold your breath waiting, your install is legal, his comment is on par with "I saw it somewhere in the code but I just can't remember where."

Although I don't like the way it looks either it does have the benefit of in the future when the panel gets changed there is plenty of jacketing to move conductors around :smile:
 

76nemo

Senior Member
Location
Ogdensburg, NY
I agree.. it would look like the HO had his neighbor do the install. For one thing it makes the neutral and ground look like a rats nest.. IMO :rolleyes:

I appreciate your opinion. I just called the buddy. He said we could go over and snap a pic tomorrow. Once the pic is posted, you can THEN tell me it looks hacky, or you can say "nice work";)


I'll forewarn you, I bring the ungrounded all the way to the bottom of the panel and then back up to it's designation in case of rework. I know some don't do this, but I appreciate it when I have to balance loads/breakers around:smile:
 
Last edited:

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
You can leave the jacket on if you so prefer. IMO it should be removed at the connector. 314.17(C) wouldn't apply to a panel so a 1/4" is not required. IMO 300.14 doesn't apply either.
 

76nemo

Senior Member
Location
Ogdensburg, NY
I am getting hung here before I get a pic up. I'm not a hack. I hate construction. You want to rope a freakin' house, go right the heck ahead. Roping might be your cup of tea, but not mine. I think NM should be dead and buried.

My buddy asked me to do him a favor. I did it. Another friend came with me to pick up the leftover tools and have a beer. He says it has to be stripped upon point of entry, I say "You're full of bologna."

I'll post a pic before the end of the night, then you can call me "filthy":wink:
 

raider1

Senior Member
Staff member
Location
Logan, Utah
Since the NEC doesn't mandate that you follow MFG instructions, then I guess your at liberty to use whatever method you choose.
You might want to take a glance at 110.3(B), the tough part of that section is trying to figure out what is part of the listing instructions and what is not.

Chris
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top