When does NEC kick in?

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lunalilo

Member
I want to know exactly when the NEC 2008 would have, or will kick in.

Is it exactly a year later? If yes, then from when the book came out or from Jan, 2008?
 

roger

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Fl
Occupation
Electrician
It all depends on your particular area. I think there are some places still using the 99 and even earlier cycles.

In NC it use to be January 1 of the year of the code but the last two cycles it has been in July.

Roger
 

Dennis Alwon

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Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
I want to know exactly when the NEC 2008 would have, or will kick in.

Is it exactly a year later? If yes, then from when the book came out or from Jan, 2008?
Where are you from? Each state has there own rules and some states have not yet accepted the 2008 NEC. Check with your AHJ.

NC generally waits about 6 months, June or july of the code year, for the code to take affect.
 

pfalcon

Senior Member
Location
Indiana
If you read the first page of the 2008 NEC it says:
... with an effective date of August 15, 2007, and supercedes all previous editions.

If you read the first page of the 2005 NEC it says:
... with an effective date of August 5, 2004, and supercedes all previous editions.

If you read the first page of the 2002 NEC it says:
... with an effective date of August 2, 2001, and supercedes all previous editions.

So NFPA replaces the book about August in the year prior to the cover year.

If you read Indiana Electric Code (675-IAC-17) it says the adoption date for those three code cycles for the state of Indiana were filed on the following dates:

filed Aug 14, 2002 for 2002 NEC
filed Oct 21, 2005 for 2005 NEC
filed Jul 27, 2009 for 2008 NEC

So if you inspect a house in Indiana that was built in 2008 - use the 2005 NEC.
 

macmikeman

Senior Member
I want to know exactly when the NEC 2008 would have, or will kick in.

Is it exactly a year later? If yes, then from when the book came out or from Jan, 2008?
Each of the four counties in Hawaii have different setups. Honolulu adopted the 2008 NEC on November 30, 2009, so any permit issued after that date requires you follow the 08 code. Honolulu county covers all of Oahu.
 

tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
The NEC has to be adopted by a city or state to be in effect. for the federal gov't, they fall under OSHA, and the general duty clause would mean the 11 NEC is effective Jan 1, 2011 ( I may be wrong and it may be the effective date published in the NEC)
 

Split Bolt

Senior Member
In the state of Virginia, we are still using the 2005 NEC, which was adopted as part of the 2006 Virginia Construction Code, under Part 1 of the Virginia Uniform Statewide Building Code, effective May 1, 2008. I have heard that the 2008 NEC might take effect here either this fall or next spring.
 

Split Bolt

Senior Member
Thanks for the welcome LF! I presently live in Woodbridge, but grew up in the Franconia area near Springfield. Most of my clients are in Mt. Vernon and Old Town Alexandria. I see you are in Richmond. I also lived there for about 3 years just after high school. ('83 - '86) I lived in "The Fan" with all of the VCU art students. Good times, good times!
 

pfalcon

Senior Member
Location
Indiana
The NEC has to be adopted by a city or state to be in effect. for the federal gov't, they fall under OSHA,
Mainly correct. Government adoption is coercive forcing people and companies to use the mandated standard. OSHA is the federal mandate. In Indiana 675-IAC-17 (Indiana Administrative Code) is the state mandate. Local authorities often have their own mandates. People and corporations may also mandate to those they have authority over. The biggest stick wins.

and the general duty clause would mean the 11 NEC is effective Jan 1, 2011 ( I may be wrong and it may be the effective date published in the NEC)
Not correct.
The general duty clause does not mandate adoption dates of any type or any time. Specific sections such as 1910.6 exist when standards and adoptions are mandated.

For the interpretive path you are following for the general duty clause the summary would be:
A) Failure to adopt a standard can be considered negligence.
B) Adopting a standard that is grossly obsolete can be considered negligence.
C) Adopting a standard that is not widely accepted, tested, and approved can be considered negligence.

In short, a state may elect to write its own custom electrical code, updated regularly, reviewed by electrical professionals regularly; and by doing so they would never have to adopt the NEC at all.

As a better example of this consider the NFPA79. This standard covers industrial machinery but is not mandated by any government authority that I am aware of. OSHAs general duty clause can be applied to an industrial site. If you fail A,B, or C above then you open your company up to OSHA actions. If you adopt NFPA79 then you close that door. Or you can write your own standard or adopt a different standard.
 

jim dungar

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Wisconsin
Occupation
Engineer
The NEC has to be adopted by a city or state to be in effect. for the federal gov't, they fall under OSHA, and the general duty clause would mean the 11 NEC is effective Jan 1, 2011 ( I may be wrong and it may be the effective date published in the NEC)
OSHA typically applies standards as soon as they are effective/published.
 

pfalcon

Senior Member
Location
Indiana
OSHA typically applies standards as soon as they are effective/published.
I disagree.

OSHA 1910.6 said:
... are incorporated by reference in the corresponding sections noted as they exist on the date of the approval, ...
The approval date is when the feds approved it. A lot of the IBRs also include the publication cycle date, especially those by NFPA. So I think you have to look at the IBR entry itself.
 
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