You can't fix stupid!

ritelec

Senior Member
Location
Jersey
If the thickness of a nail plate bothers you how picky are you with how straight the studs are? It is hard to find ones that don't bow more than thickness of a nail plate.
picky.

I go through each one when picking a stud or joist for install (when I have my carpenter hat on). Besides bows, the standard 2X whatevers vary anywhere from from 1/16th to 1/4 of an inch.


As far as the nail plate, besides a minor hump, I don't like that the sheet of rock will not be laying completely against the beam (little play, nail/screw pop stuff).


Anally me,
Rich
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
picky.

I go through each one when picking a stud or joist for install (when I have my carpenter hat on). Besides bows, the standard 2X whatevers vary anywhere from from 1/16th to 1/4 of an inch.


As far as the nail plate, besides a minor hump, I don't like that the sheet of rock will not be laying completely against the beam (little play, nail/screw pop stuff).


Anally me,
Rich
I've seen guys have to deal with bowed walls trying to hang cabinets install doors or windows or even hang a mirror (they don't bend well at all:cool:) but just to hang drywall is a little more forgiving especially when it is only 1/8 inch. I have also seen studs that were straight when placed in the wall but later started to bend as it dried out more.
 

ritelec

Senior Member
Location
Jersey
I've seen guys have to deal with bowed walls trying to hang cabinets install doors or windows or even hang a mirror (they don't bend well at all:cool:) but just to hang drywall is a little more forgiving especially when it is only 1/8 inch. I have also seen studs that were straight when placed in the wall but later started to bend as it dried out more.
Yes...............................

just to add, placing perfectly aligned straight studs will also warble if you don't finish the job with the rock really really soon. gar gar gar gar...............where's that sawzall????



Too friggin anal,
Rich
 
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Gac66610

Senior Member
Location
Kansas
We all have our issues with inspections - and the insulation guys are no exception.

Call it another example of seminar training .... inspectors are all focused on the holes we run our wires through and the recesed lights. "Energy codes." Can't have that air leakage!

Step out, visit a few non-electrical forums. Home inspectors', for one. Or, sites like the 'green building advisor.' Yup- look for LEED to make things worse.

Just try telling these folks that we've been down this road before (remember the Carter years?), and the result was the 'mold crisis.' You can't tell these fools that homes need to breathe.

Indeed, visit an HVAC forum, and you'll see some lovely problems arise when homes are too tight; like, say, the bath fan tripping the CO detector, because the furance is now back-drafting. Or the kitchen fan not moving much air, because there's no fresh air coming in.
they are having HVAC install "make up air supply" six or eight inch insulated supply from outside directly into the return air duct
 

Gac66610

Senior Member
Location
Kansas
A professional insulation contractor should hire qualified employees, & have some sort of training

program. The insulation boss should explain to his employees the conquences of their actions.

In the abscence of such, it's time to back charge the General Contractor.
:lol: one of my GC's runs an insulating company ... could get interesting
 
Ok, I thought it was just me.

I really hate to stereotype, but I have yet to find a foam insulation contractor that cares one bit about the other trades on the job. I wish I had a nickel for every time I've gone to a house we've wired between the foam and sheetrock stage to see wires that we'd run straight now bent + pulled tight at turns because the foam guys hung from them like they were a ladder or knelt on them in the attic. I've had the same conversation with one guy twice now explaining to him that when he completely fills the area between the housing for a bath fan and the plywood on the roof, that the expansion of the foam pushes the housing out of the ceiling.
I think your complaint is valid, but I would like to extend it to other trades as well.

I think it basically has to do with advancement of technology and who gets paid.

Equipment that is being installed today is more complex and technologically sophisticated than yesterdays. Instinctively one would think that the trade skills involved in their installation would need to be higher than before, but I think it is not so, rather the opposite is true.

Manufacturers seem to TAKE the trades skills out the products installation requirements. This is for several reasons. They don't want to depend on the installer for the proper function of the unit, to deflect potential liability arguments, to be able to more readily sell the same product into countries that have less sophisticated craftspeople and finally to actually design a product that can be installed by dummies and DIY and to be able to sell it at a higher price. In other words they are taking away the bread from the electricians.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I agree. The only way to get the insulator's attention is when it starts costing him money. When he loses money on several jobs in a row for the same reason, maybe he'll figure it out.
Problem is the insulators, just like the drywallers, have already been paid and no longer on project when these problems are discovered. How do you hold pay from someone that has already been paid? Most you can usually do is just complain and hope it helps for next time. Next time they will have new guys on the crew and it will start all over again.
 
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