Changeover Fitting

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tkb

Senior Member
Location
MA
Remember the old argument about using an EMT connector, rigid coupling and a flex connector and whether the coupling was listed for the purpose?

I just saw this add in EC&M magazine.
This fitting is UL iisted to use with any fitting that you can connect to it.

 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
They have been making EMT to Flex and other changeover fittings for a long time. Problem has always been that they only come in small sizes. I've never seen one lager than 1.25". That Arlington fitting looks nice but how does it differ from the three piece method?
 

tkb

Senior Member
Location
MA
I think the argument was the listing.
These show they are listed and they advertise that they are for any fitting that will screw into them.

I never thought there was a problem with the three piece method.

I am only posting this because I never saw this fitting before from Arlington.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
I think the argument was the listing.
These show they are listed and they advertise that they are for any fitting that will screw into them.

I never thought there was a problem with the three piece method.

I am only posting this because I never saw this fitting before from Arlington.

I've never seen one either so thanks or posting it. I hope that they eventually make them in sizes up to 4". :)
 

zombie

Member
Location
pennsylvania
We weren't aloud to use these in a hospital where I was working. All Emt coupling and connectors had to be compression fittings so we always used the rigid coupling method
 

Cavie

Senior Member
Location
SW Florida
For 40 years I've been useing and never got turned down using the galv coupling. Some people just take the listing thing a little too far. ther are much bigber battles to fight.
 

Barndog

Senior Member
Location
Spring Creek Pa
Im with the rest on you I would just use a EMT connector to a rigid coupling then to what ever is next Flex, rigid pipe, or whatever. I have seen this done alot. I bet that fitting is more expensive than the coupling. also to change size couldn't you use a reducing bushing threaded into the coupling?
 

tkb

Senior Member
Location
MA
When I first started inthe trade, the guy that I was working for used these EMT couplings that had a threaded part that you coud hammer on and it had a thin aluminum threaded coupling.

He also used a box connector that you slid in from in the box and it had a compression nut on the outside.
It didn't have threads on the inside of the box, it was rounded over and tapered to the compression nut so when you tightened it it pulled tighter to the box.

It was pretty cool, but I haven't seen then for 30 years.
 

Okie Sparky

Member
Location
NW Oklahoma
He also used a box connector that you slid in from in the box and it had a compression nut on the outside.
It didn't have threads on the inside of the box, it was rounded over and tapered to the compression nut so when you tightened it it pulled tighter to the box.

It was pretty cool, but I haven't seen then for 30 years.

What you describe here sounds like what we used to call a 2-piece connector. I think you can still get them or at least you could mmm..... a few years ago, haven't checked lately. Try this
 

tkb

Senior Member
Location
MA
He also used a box connector that you slid in from in the box and it had a compression nut on the outside.
It didn't have threads on the inside of the box, it was rounded over and tapered to the compression nut so when you tightened it it pulled tighter to the box.

It was pretty cool, but I haven't seen then for 30 years.

What you describe here sounds like what we used to call a 2-piece connector. I think you can still get them or at least you could mmm..... a few years ago, haven't checked lately. Try this
That is it. I didn't think they were made anymore.
It's a nice fitting, it doesn't take any space in the box.
 

jmellc

Senior Member
Location
Central NC
Remember the old argument about using an EMT connector, rigid coupling and a flex connector and whether the coupling was listed for the purpose?

I just saw this add in EC&M magazine.
This fitting is UL iisted to use with any fitting that you can connect to it.

Arlington makes a lot of good stuff. I like their various in boxes for low profile outdoor GFI's. They have several types of recessed outlets for TV's, combination boxes/brackets for power & cable. They make a good post for mounting lights too.
 

hurk27

Senior Member
I could see where changing from ridge to EMT, or to PVC, but FMC, or other flexible conduits, I hate it when I see a conduit in a box and think I have a pathway to get more wires in to only find that a previous person changed over inside of a wall.:mad:

I know 348.42 doesn't allow a right angle connector to be install concealed, which is for the very reason I stated above, but in this advertisement, it showing some 2 to 1 connectors for flex which to me would cause the same problem.
 

krisinjersey

Senior Member
Too Bad!

Too Bad!

Too bad they don't make these bigger than 3/4". You might actually be able to use them where the fittings are more expensive and this would save you a bit more on each set up. I agree that Arlington must have some experienced electricians in their design department. Some of the stuff they have is exactly the solution for situations we've been running into for years.
 

sd4524

Senior Member
These look great. 2 Years ago a company i worked for did 10 suites in a big TI. The walls were concrete so we did exposed emt with mc above the ceiling. Did the mc connect- ridgid coupling- emt connector for weeks at a time. I thought it was a pretty crappy install.
 

hurk27

Senior Member
These look great. 2 Years ago a company i worked for did 10 suites in a big TI. The walls were concrete so we did exposed emt with mc above the ceiling. Did the mc connect- ridgid coupling- emt connector for weeks at a time. I thought it was a pretty crappy install.
I got to ask, how did you terminate the MC cable in the EMT?

Or did you mean FMC conduit to EMT?
 

hurk27

Senior Member
2 screw mc connector screws into ridgid coupling. ridgid coupling screws into emt connector at the end of emt. The worst was the duplex mc connectors.
I know how you connected the MC jacket to the EMT, but MC is a cable, it already has the conductors in it from the factory, this is why I ask if you ment FMC, in which you put the conductors in it like a raceway, with MC you would have to remove enough of the outer spiral jacket for the conductors to reach the other end of the EMT?

330.2 Definition.
Metal Clad Cable, Type MC. A factory assembly of one or more insulated circuit conductors with or without optical fiber members enclosed in an armor of interlocking metal tape, or a smooth or corrugated metallic sheath.
I don't see someone changing in the middle of a run with MC unless it is a very short EMT run.

Now FMC sure, see 348:

348.2 Definition.
Flexible Metal Conduit (FMC). A raceway of circular cross section made of helically wound, formed, interlocked metal strip.
As it is a raceway that you install conductors in.
 

sd4524

Senior Member
Now I got your question. Strip off the mc and then put the connector, coupling, connector. Some of the walls were over 16 feet tall and it was a major pia to strip off that much mc and then jam down the 1/2 emt. Like i posted earlier, I thought it was a crappy install.
Not my money, not my call.
 
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