incandescent bulb ban and redcution of wattage

Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
Have any of you been affected by the recent ban.
I had a customer recently was quite upset when I re-lamped her 4" can's with the new 39 watt Halogen.
she called me back and showed me the light illuminating her table. " doesn't that look dim to you. Dreary"
Yea it's a real pain trying to explain that those Govt yahoos you elected caused you this! They banned a real 50 watt Halogen.

Weird thing is you can still get a 50watt MR16


You can't seem to get the real Mccoy anymore.
 

mopowr steve

Senior Member
Location
NW Ohio
I'm with you on this one,
Lumen output should not be affected by the reduction of wattage, and don't give me this equivalent crap. They should have taken the highest lumen output of a particular wattage bulb and used it as a benchmark to design the new bulbs around instead of making up some equivalent lumen output of some bulbs that have already suffered from lower wattage mandates and having lessened lumen output compared to incandescent bulbs years ago. After all lighting designs were based on what a fixtures output would be and in many cases no one is planning on adding more fixtures to get the same amount of light that they used to have.
 
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Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
I'm with you on this one,
Lumen output should not be affected by the reduction of wattage, and don't give me this equivalent crap. They should have taken the highest lumen output of a particular wattage bulb and used it as a benchmark to design the new bulbs around instead of making up some equivalent lumen output of some bulbs that have already suffered from lower wattage mandates and having lessened lumen output compared to incandescent bulbs years ago. After all lighting designs were based on what a fixtures output would be and in many cases no one is planning on adding more fixtures to get the same amount of light that they used to have.

Exactly!
Add those Lutron ECO dimmers and you have a effective light output much less than expected.
 

Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
I think they are fine in a kitchen work area or a garage. In a dine area living room or reading room I cannot stand them. Even a 90 CRI.
 

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
I am surprised nobody else sees this as an issue!
Never mind lumen output and CRI, I'm ticked at the life expectancy. I've posted this elswhere, but it bears repeating.

When they first came out, they touted 23,000 hour average life, even for dimmables. In my kitchen overheads, they barely lasted 2 years. Even if I left them on 24/7 I should, on average, get almost 3 years out of them. NOW they say basically you get 4,000 hours. At about 5X the cost of equivalent incandescents. No more CFL's for me, thanks.
 

xformer

Senior Member
Location
Dallas, Tx
I am surprised nobody else sees this as an issue!
I see it as an issue... I ran into the same issue for someone who recently replaced a ceiling fan... the light kit in the fan was being used for general lighting of a living room. The light kit had a wattage limiter on it and as a result dimly lit the room. The only recourse was to use CFLS or LED's. I think the industry intends to push us toward LED's with a CFL interlude..
 

Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
I see it as an issue... I ran into the same issue for someone who recently replaced a ceiling fan... the light kit in the fan was being used for general lighting of a living room. The light kit had a wattage limiter on it and as a result dimly lit the room. The only recourse was to use CFLS or LED's. I think the industry intends to push us toward LED's with a CFL interlude..

Wattage limiter- was this for heat protection or energy savings.
 

mopowr steve

Senior Member
Location
NW Ohio
Wattage limiter- was this for heat protection or energy savings.
Some paddle fan manufacturers have installed wattage limiters in their fans which only allows up to approx 160-200 watts of total consumption for energy savings. Installing a combination of bulb wattages that goes over the limit will cause light kit to be disconnected by wattage limiter.
 

xformer

Senior Member
Location
Dallas, Tx
Some paddle fan manufacturers have installed wattage limiters in their fans which only allows up to approx 160-200 watts of total consumption for energy savings. Installing a combination of bulb wattages that goes over the limit will cause light kit to be disconnected by wattage limiter.
Actually, the experience I had caused the lamps to dim when the wattage of the lamps was over 200. Upon energizing the circuit, the lamps would full power, then in about a second they would dim...
 

Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
Some paddle fan manufacturers have installed wattage limiters in their fans which only allows up to approx 160-200 watts of total consumption for energy savings. Installing a combination of bulb wattages that goes over the limit will cause light kit to be disconnected by wattage limiter.
interesting that the lighting manufature would do this nation wide I suppose that may be part of the Nations energy mandate.
 

xformer

Senior Member
Location
Dallas, Tx
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