Is UL ceritfied the same as UL listed?

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mstrmp3

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Inspector fails us on our POE switch for IP cameras as not being UL listed (he wanted to see a UL sticker), but according to the manufacturer the switches are UL 60950-1, CSA 60950-1, EN 60950-1, and IEC 60950-1 certified. (and there are logos on the label showing these certifications). Is this not the same as being UL?
 

rbalex

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All of the cerifications ending in 60950-1 are basically meaningless since it means the testing organization was certifying to an IEC standard; however, the CSA - US means CSA was using a US standard to certify the equipment. The inspector should have accepted it. It isn't exactly the same as UL, but it is properly "listed."
 

rbalex

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so this should be ok as properly labeled and listed?
I was wrong about the Standard's status. While the base Standard is IEC, UL 60950-1 is still UL's Standard for Electrical Equipment for Laboratory Use; Part 1: General Requirements. CSA is a recognized NRTL for this product.

The inspector should accept it.
 

jim dungar

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I was wrong about the Standard's status. While the base Standard is IEC, UL 60950-1 is still UL's Standard for Electrical Equipment for Laboratory Use; Part 1: General Requirements. CSA is a recognized NRTL for this product.

The inspector should accept it.
Only if it is being used in a Laboratory.

This seems to be a common problem with 'computer' equipment, the environment for which they are listed have little to do with where they are intended to be installed.

I have seen this on:
Ethernet switches and hubs
Operator interface screens (HMIs)
UPS systems
 

rbalex

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Only if it is being used in a Laboratory.

This seems to be a common problem with 'computer' equipment, the environment for which they are listed have little to do with where they are intended to be installed.

I have seen this on:
Ethernet switches and hubs
Operator interface screens (HMIs)
UPS systems
This is UL's Scope for the Standard. It doesn't restrict the use to laboratories. Point of Sale/Exchange (POS/POE) is a specific acceptable application. With all the additional applicable reference standards it's hard to believe the product is dangerous as used in the OP description.
 

jim dungar

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This is UL's Scope for the Standard. It doesn't restrict the use to laboratories. Point of Sale/Exchange (POS/POE) is a specific acceptable application. With all the additional applicable reference standards it's hard to believe the product is dangerous as used in the OP description.
I was responding to your post where you used the word Laboratory as a descriptor for the UL Listing. Many 'office' products are used on the factory floor even though they may not have been evaluated for those installations (when was the last time you saw a NEMA 12 calculator?).

i believe it is up to the AHJ to make an approval or disapproval, and not blindly accept or deny based on the presence or absence of a simple 'listing sticker'. The listing is simply a tool to be employed by the AHJ. It is not possible for every listing Agency or manufacturer to determine all possible applications and installations of their products.
 

rbalex

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These old eyes. The title I originally supplied was a "cut & paste" error. It should have simply been Information Technology Equipment. I "cut" the title below the correct one from the referenced NRTL page.

You're right that it's an AHJ call to accept the installation. We were just establishing CSA UL was a proper NRTL for the product, not whether it was installed correctly. I'd be thoroughly pissed as the designer/selector if I had determined it was a proper application and it was rejected simply because it wasn't "UL listed"
 
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