Splice kit approved for behind walls?

njbraskey

New member
Location
NA
Hello all,

Last week a friend put a screw through a wall and straight into a wire. They called out an electrician who cut a small square of the dry wall away and added the splice pictured below. I was surprised when he told me the electrician said he could go ahead and fix the dry wall to fill the hole now. My understanding of the code (which is limited) from 314.72 D is that all splices would have to be installed so that the conductors are accessible. Is this some type of new splice that's allowed to be hidden behind walls or was he misinformed?

IMG_20160720_081924_01.jpg

Thank you
NB
 

al hildenbrand

Senior Member
Location
Minnesota
Occupation
Electrical Contractor, Electrical Consultant, Electrical Engineer
To my eyes, the wire itself looks to be more of an issue, as it appears to be a cord.

Cords can't be used as a substitute for the permanent wiring of a Premises Wiring (System).
 

FionaZuppa

Senior Member
Location
AZ
a single 240 bc, or is that a mwbc. 3 blacks and a red ?? or is that red-blk-blk-gray? doesnt even look like proper cord.
 

FionaZuppa

Senior Member
Location
AZ
It looks like a Red, Black, Blue (dark), and a Brown.
Definitely not standard US colors for NM cable.
looks like cord. those colors do not seem to match US even using mixed alternate colors.??

maybe its red-blk-dark grn-gray ??

 
Last edited:

mopowr steve

Senior Member
Location
NW Ohio
Even though the connection may not need a junction box I would still say there needed to be some form of access to it! Maybe just a wall access cover. Someday those plugs will need replaced.
Those plugs look like something used quit often when joining two halves of modular homes together in which I typically see them shoved up above the moisture-barrier-plastic in the underbelly of modular homes. Not easy to find at times but somewhat accessible.
 

charlie b

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Seattle, WA
Occupation
Electrical Engineer
My understanding of the code (which is limited) from 314.72 D is that all splices would have to be installed so that the conductors are accessible.
That article applies to circuits over 1000 volts, and is therefore not applicable to this installation. I don't have time to look for the "under 1000 volts" version of this requirement. But I will observe that this article does not talk about wiring and splices being accessible. It says that the wires inside a box need to be accessible. If there is a rule about splices that are not done inside a box being accessible, this is not that rule.
 

user 100

Senior Member
Location
texas
It's an article 400 cord with white, black, red and green.
Almost certainly is.

the wire on right is not white.
I think it is-

Could be the lighting in the pic isn't optimum and maybe the clear plastic is a little clouded over. Maybe we're wrong- maybe the wire is ns tc, maybe it's some weird speaker wire, whatever it is, it isn't legal- that's the most important aspect.
 

user 100

Senior Member
Location
texas
Could be the lighting in the pic isn't optimum and maybe the clear plastic is a little clouded over. Maybe we're wrong- maybe the wire is ns tc, maybe it's some weird speaker wire, whatever it is, it isn't legal- that's the most important aspect.
^ ^ ^ ^ ^ ^
Meant to say that the application of the cord wasn't legal, not that the cord itself was illegal.:slaphead:
 

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
Yes, code wise it could be and the one in the picture "might" be.

However while I have not handled every rubber cord produced I have never found one with a natural gray neutral. I do find rubber cords with very faint pigments. Reds that look pink, blues that look green etc

At the end of the day whatever color that is the product is not NM, it is cord and not code compliant with that type of connector.
 
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