3 Year NEC Cycle Too Often?

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tom baker

First Chief Moderator
Staff member
I agree on 5 years. I made the same comment to an Idaho inspector at the IAEI mtg in Boise. He had asked NFPA about it, and answer was it can't be done.
Submit this as a change for the 2014 NEC....
 

480sparky

Senior Member
Location
Iowegia
Remind him that the NEC is the minimum requirement. AFCI/GFCI exceeds requirements.
My point is, what do you do with technology that isn't addressed in the codebook, but is available on the market?

Like fuel cell systems, electrified truck parking spaces, electric vehicle charging systems and PV work?
 

roger

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Fl
Occupation
Electrician
My point is, what do you do with technology that isn't addressed in the codebook, but is available on the market?

Like fuel cell systems, electrified truck parking spaces, electric vehicle charging systems and PV work?
All of those items are addressed.

Roger
 

renosteinke

Senior Member
Location
NE Arkansas
Fact is, Chicago was "decades behind" at one time, and didn't suffer. Indeed, Chicago continues to demonstrate that you don't need a 'national' code at all.

These days, it seems every non-electrician wants things spelled out to the Nth degree, just so they can second-guess the sparky. The NEC is being applied in areas for which it was never intended .... witness the insurance companies that won't insure a house with less than a 100-amp service, let alone K&T and fuses!

Last years' release of a UL/ NFPA/ HUD study about older electrical systems confirmed what we've all suspected for some time: where there's an electrical safety issue, you find violations of basic principles that were well known when the Japanese were bombing Pearl Harbor. No updated code will ever cure such hack work.

So, I question the value of updating the code at all. I propose a 20-year moratorium on any code 'changes,' excepting poor grammar and spelling errors.

The NFPA is not the AHJ, and it's time AHJ's stopped hiding behind it.
 

roger

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Fl
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Electrician
They are NOW, but what do you do with a technology that ISN'T in the Code? There was a time that the Code doesn't address most of what's in your NEC now.
And most of us are not still using those older codes.

Where the older codes are still in place, 90.4 would give the AHJ direction as to a way to handle the situation.

If you have an inspector that won't allow you to use new technology then go with the flow or contest his/her position to a higher authority.


Roger
 

renosteinke

Senior Member
Location
NE Arkansas
Simple ... let the installation be signed off by a licensed master electrician, electrical contractor, or professional engineer. They're trained, and paid, to do the thinking.

Look, there's not much about electricity that wasn't known in the 20's ... that's when Theremin, Steinmetz, and the other giants were doing their thing.

Might be nice to require SOME trade competence on the part of inspectors. There are far too many whose only experience is in reading code books and passing tests. This is born out by all the 'certified' and 'combination' inspectors out there.
 

Sierrasparky

Senior Member
Location
USA
Occupation
Electrician ,contractor
And most of us are not still using those older codes.

Where the older codes are still in place, 90.4 would give the AHJ direction as to a way to handle the situation.

If you have an inspector that won't allow you to use new technology then go with the flow or contest his/her position to a higher authority.


Roger
Why can't the industry that generates the technology adopt the proper installations. The NEC does not need to step in all over the place. The NEC does not need to place a rule on each and every type of installation all they need is a lot of general requirements. After all in my state the license board uses the term " normal standards of practice" .

If you recall we always need to refer to the manufactures spec and instructions a lot of the time when perfoming your work.
 

steve66

Senior Member
Is a local jurisdiction better equipped to decide all code changes than all the people listed in the front of your code book (CMP's)? Highly doubt it! I also think it is ridiculous that some locals are still on the '99 and '02 cycles and the '11 is out
What's wrong with that??

Is the new code always that much safer?

If so, maybe we should always have to go back to every single house and buidling that's ever been built and upgrade it to the newest code everytime a new NEC is published.

Steve
 

480sparky

Senior Member
Location
Iowegia
And most of us are not still using those older codes.

Where the older codes are still in place, 90.4 would give the AHJ direction as to a way to handle the situation.

If you have an inspector that won't allow you to use new technology then go with the flow or contest his/her position to a higher authority.


Roger
How can an inspector refuse your install when it's not prohibited?
 

roger

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Fl
Occupation
Electrician
Why can't the industry that generates the technology adopt the proper installations. The NEC does not need to step in all over the place. The NEC does not need to place a rule on each and every type of installation all they need is a lot of general requirements. After all in my state the license board uses the term " normal standards of practice" .

If you recall we always need to refer to the manufactures spec and instructions a lot of the time when perfoming your work.
You're preaching to the choir here, I still ask why inspectors have to rely on a listing instead of their own expertise.

Roger
 

roger

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Fl
Occupation
Electrician
How can an inspector refuse your install when it's not prohibited?
I don't know, I think you should be allowed to cram rotten meat in every outlet box (which isn't prohibited) but I was told many inspectors won't allow that either, go figure. :roll:

Roger
 
3 year NEC code cycle

3 year NEC code cycle

In Tennessee the local juridications have to stay within 6 year of whatever the State choses to adopt . As an Inspector and Contractor I agree that the 3 year cycle should be extended to at lest 5 years and then the Code Panelist would not be pressed into adopting some of the useless changes that are forceing on the Public . I have one of the Panelist on our Staff. Remember the Code is the Minimum. The extended time would allow the locals to adopt new and benifical items for their public safety
One Mans Simple Thoughts
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
Every five years would get my vote. CEU's and code updates for every three year cycle is too much. Not to mention the costs involved.
 
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