"Bugs"

mstrlucky74

Senior Member
Location
NJ
Has anyone heard the terminology "bug" when referring to a splice. I've heard it before a few times and even "bug nut". Anyone know where thise came from?

also, there seems to be so many diff "taps" for splicing. When you splice a FEEDER how do you determine which type you'll use? Guys I know pefer Ilsco products? Thanks
 

GoldDigger

Moderator
Staff member
Just a guess, namely that the taped up splice looks like a bug sitting on the wire.
Similar to the reason that certain crimp on splices used by Telco workers are called beans.
 

mopowr steve

Senior Member
Location
NW Ohio
Yes, a bug = split bolt connector $$$
Used to use them quite often for hot line taps durring fair events. We no longer do that though.
More permanent methods used now in which we use H-tap connectors like the POCO uses.
 

peter d

Senior Member
Location
New England
Yes, a bug = split bolt connector $$$
Used to use them quite often for hot line taps durring fair events. We no longer do that though.
More permanent methods used now in which we use H-tap connectors like the POCO uses.
It's still standard practice though we use a parallel groove mechanical connector rather than a conventional split bolt, per poco specs. H-tap crimpers are too expensive for the average resi EC that only does the occasional service change.
 

mstrlucky74

Senior Member
Location
NJ
Yes, a bug = split bolt connector $$$
Used to use them quite often for hot line taps durring fair events. We no longer do that though.
More permanent methods used now in which we use H-tap connectors like the POCO uses.
Thanks...and thier called H-Tap...why?
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Has anyone heard the terminology "bug" when referring to a splice. I've heard it before a few times and even "bug nut". Anyone know where thise came from?

also, there seems to be so many diff "taps" for splicing. When you splice a FEEDER how do you determine which type you'll use? Guys I know pefer Ilsco products? Thanks
Forget using "bugs" (as mentioned previously slang for split-bolts). Ilsco type splices are much better for several reasons. One you do not need to tape them and two if the connectors are properly torqued then you'll know for sure that the connection is good. Split-bolts seem to never get tight enough even after you tighten, bash with Channel-locks several times, tighten and repeat.
:roll:
 
Around here Bugs refer to split bolts. I think they still have their place, in the case of when you want to "tap" a conductor and cant or dont want to cut it. For just plain splicing of two conductors, I prefer the setscrew butt connectors due to their speed and low cost. The "polaris" type insulated set screw type are great for more complicated splicing/tapping tasks and their only downside is they are expensive.
 

JFletcher

Senior Member
Location
Williamsburg, VA
Just a guess, namely that the taped up splice looks like a bug sitting on the wire.
Similar to the reason that certain crimp on splices used by Telco workers are called beans.
Jellybeans. Still common for scotchlok UY2 and UR3 connectors. Still have the $20 pliers whose sole purpose is to crimp those things flat.
 

mivey

Senior Member
Forget using "bugs" (as mentioned previously slang for split-bolts). Ilsco type splices are much better for several reasons. One you do not need to tape them and two if the connectors are properly torqued then you'll know for sure that the connection is good. Split-bolts seem to never get tight enough even after you tighten, bash with Channel-locks several times, tighten and repeat.
:roll:
I quit doing that and just brought a hammer. You will beat the stew out of your pliers like that and they start to look like road rash.
 
Top