Is there a possibility of a grease fire?

user 100

Senior Member
Location
texas
Sorry but I never understand people that say they will never eat somewhere or eat a particular product again after they see something that happens in a place that processes food or even grows food. I guess we shelter too many of some realities that are out there.

Some can't quite wrap around the idea that that juicy steak they love was possibly once walking around in a feedlot.

You only eat fruits/vegetables - what do you think fertilizer comes from? Even if it is "organic"?

There is a circle of life on this planet.
With many it's just the cleanliness issue. I don't care if what I am eating used to be a cow or a chicken, but I would prefer that it be cooked properly and not have a roach or a rat trek on it or the plate it's on before I eat it.

Best sometimes I think to follow the adage: If you don't see/hear/smell it, it isn't there and never was.:p
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
With many it's just the cleanliness issue. I don't care if what I am eating used to be a cow or a chicken, but I would prefer that it be cooked properly and not have a roach or a rat trek on it or the plate it's on before I eat it.

Best sometimes I think to follow the adage: If you don't see/hear/smell it, it isn't there and never was.:p
I can understant the roach or rat issue, but a little grease on surfaces in the kitchen is not the worst thing that can happen. I have worked in food processing facilities, they are like any other place where you have production workers. They maybe follow rules most of the time, but there are times when things aren't going right, somebody is having a bad day, or something just breaks down or has something out of the ordinary happen and they just don't care at that moment to handle it the proper way. I'm not trying to make excuses for them but it still happens.

Once you get beyond individual employee incidents there is still plenty of things that gross people out. When a food place has product that doesn't meet quality standards for whatever reason - they don't just throw it out, they look for ways to still utilize it that still meet standards. A load of product that has reached expiration dates - may get blended into new product. Go back to the restaurant - today's leftovers don't get thrown out (not talking about what customers left on their plates) they get used in something else tomorrow. Today's excess baked potatoes are part of tomorrow's mashed potatoes or put into potato salad. Some customers are picky enough they would throw a fit if they knew this.
 

growler

Senior Member
Location
Atlanta,GA
Some can't quite wrap around the idea that that juicy steak they love was possibly once walking around in a feedlot.
I don't much mind if the cow was walking around nice and healthy but I don't much like the idea of the cow dieing of natural causes.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I don't much mind if the cow was walking around nice and healthy but I don't much like the idea of the cow dieing of natural causes.
Understand that, cow's aren't quite as bad, but if you like pork - you don't want to know what those pigs will all eat if they get the chance, they eat everything
 

mgookin

Senior Member
Location
Fort Myers, FL
In the chicken processing plants in Baltimore every chicken had a thermometer in it. Any chicken not down to spec temperature went into a train car bound for Camden, NJ. Mmm Mmm good!
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
In the chicken processing plants in Baltimore every chicken had a thermometer in it. Any chicken not down to spec temperature went into a train car bound for Camden, NJ. Mmm Mmm good!
Unless different type of processing plant then what is typical that is a lot of thermometers, or is that part of the genetics and they are born with a thermometer now:)
 

JFletcher

Senior Member
Location
Williamsburg, VA
Just make the mistake of talking to a pc who does grease traps for those places and wait for one of them to carry on about the odor/ stuff they find when they fix overflows and ruptures at joints where management is lax.:sick::sick:
I used to work where the septic trucks dump. There is no worse smell than a seafood restaurant's grease trap's contents being dumped on a hot summer's day. And the primary clarifier sludge samples for the next 5 days...
 

brantmacga

Senior Member
Location
Georgia
Occupation
Electrical contractor
I would have a local fab shop make you a stainless enclosure wrap and cover for cleaning purposes.

Although I've seen many, many Square D narrow equipment chase panels that did not have a stainless cover at all, but I've only seen those installed on the opposite side of the prep table from fryers, but still they can get grease in them. The landing table panels with stainless covers will rarely have grease in them.

The drawings I've been getting in lately for restaurants are doing away with that equipment panel in the kitchen and opting for another panelboard installed with the gear to feed prep line equipment.


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ritelec

Senior Member
Location
Jersey
Thank you for all the feedback.

I wound up getting a regular enclosure. Seal tight. And FD boxes within use covers.

Told the owner he would need to have someone fabricate SS around the panel.


long or short of it I returned the materials and punted.

Power distribution and years of bandaid wiring intimidated me.

But thanks again. This is good to know.
 

brantmacga

Senior Member
Location
Georgia
Occupation
Electrical contractor
Told the owner he would need to have someone fabricate SS around the panel.
Find yourself a fab shop to work with and pickup the extra dollars. I'll sell anything I can install and put a markup on.

It also lets you deliver a turn-key install without any further action by the customer.

Or at the least offer it as an option.

If you can get into restaurant work, it'll become more necessary.



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