Pulling Heads

jusme123

Senior Member
Location
NY
I’m old school, I think making a head up takes more stress before ripping apart, which is rare if head made correctly.


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JFletcher

Senior Member
Location
Williamsburg, VA
For that size wire, that is a great method. For smaller wires, Kellum grips are faster.

For pulling com wire, where you will have multiple pulls through the same wire tray or other supports, taping the wires together then putting a single half hitch knot or choker, on to the pull string then taping that to the lead is the fastest way to rig wire and leave another pull string in play. That knot is not very secure, however you're not supposed to exceed 25 lb pulling force on twisted pair and small coax cables, so they work fine.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
We buy all of our large conductors with the heads already attached. Since our labor cost is very high it ends up being much cheaper to pay someone to put them on before the reels hit the job site. Also our failure rate for the crimped on heads is zero.

 

mstrlucky74

Senior Member
Location
NJ
We buy all of our large conductors with the heads already attached. Since our labor cost is very high it ends up being much cheaper to pay someone to put them on before the reels hit the job site. Also our failure rate for the crimped on heads is zero.

Makes a lot of sense! So they are garbage after that reel is pulled and heads are attached to each and every reel you order/pull?? Thanks.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Yes they're not reusable and we order the conductors with them already attached. I believe that they're only about $100 per reel.
 

Buck Parrish

Senior Member
Location
NC & IN
I too. am from the old school. But I do like using the crimped on ones. Mainly because you tell the supply house what size, how many and how long. It all comes on one roll, colored and ready to pull. Unless it's a real long pull, then it's several reels
 

jmellc

Senior Member
Location
Central NC
For that size wire, that is a great method. For smaller wires, Kellum grips are faster.

For pulling com wire, where you will have multiple pulls through the same wire tray or other supports, taping the wires together then putting a single half hitch knot or choker, on to the pull string then taping that to the lead is the fastest way to rig wire and leave another pull string in play. That knot is not secure, however you're not supposed to exceed 25 lb pulling force on twisted pair and small coax cables, so they work fine.
For multiple com pulls, I like to use a #12 stranded wire as the next pull wire. Slick and smooth, slim, won't tangle and strong enough to pull with. Pull another one with next pull and alternate them. Leave one in with the final pull so it's there if ever needed again.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
There are larger Kellum's grips, and they are much faster to install than stripping and making up a head like in the video in OP's link.

I have one that will accept about any combination of conductors you would ever pull in 2-2.5 inch conduit. Never had it lose conductors during the pull, pulling rope will break before the grip breaks as well.
 

mstrlucky74

Senior Member
Location
NJ
There are larger Kellum's grips, and they are much faster to install than stripping and making up a head like in the video in OP's link.

I have one that will accept about any combination of conductors you would ever pull in 2-2.5 inch conduit. Never had it lose conductors during the pull, pulling rope will break before the grip breaks as well.

Which one is it.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
For larger conductor sizes, I would most often used this type, prior to the supplier crimped ones.
Those were our grips of choice before the crimp on ones were available at so little cost. I can remember pulling 750kcmil copper risers with those up 20 stories with those without failure. For larger conductors there is quite a bit of prep time because you need to remove several layers of the conductor strands but they never fail when installed correctly. We've actually had to remove the set screws and use the Super Tugger to get them off at times. The Kellum type grips don't seem to work well with the super slick conductors like SIM-pull unless you spend the time putting on layers of tape and tie wire the end.
 
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