Rules for apprentices

qcroanoke

Sometimes I don't know if I'm the boxer or the bag
Location
Roanoke, VA.
Occupation
Engineering
Be willing to work for low wages. Or you can work at Kroger or even Bojangles and make more and be in a controlled environment, Inside and 72.
 

ActionDave

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Durango, CO, 10 h 20 min without traffic from wing
Occupation
wire pulling grunt
Show up on time.
Keep accurate records of the times and places you worked.
Keep accurate inventory records if this is your job.
Stock the truck after using something.
Maintain company tools.
Constantly improve your knowledge and mechanical skill.
Clean up your work area.
Minimize mistakes.
Use scrap material where possible.
No side jobs except for your mom.
Study if enrolled in apprenticeship.
Keep up with the latest NEC and local code amendments.
Don't borrow tools or anything from other workers without permission.
If you borrow something and break/lose it, buy them a new one.
Inform the shop of changes in your contact information.
Learn how to read and understand blueprints, job specs, etc.
Don't bring pets, children, or friends to the job.
Don't leave early without permission.
Don't miss days without a good reason.
Ask for time off well in advance.
Schedule vacation in writing. Keep a copy.
Advise job supervisor when you can not work overtime.
No working on live circuits if you're not qualified.
You get a paycheck for working, not just showing up.
Don't expect much in the way of gratitude from anyone.
Be pleasant to customers regardless. Or leave.
Don't quote a price to anyone for anything.
Plan your work. Work your plan.
Evaluate your work each day on the way home.
Help load and unload the trucks bringing material.
Don't use the couple top steps of a ladder.
Do not climb up the ‘back side’ of a ladder.
No smoking. Period.
Do every job the best way you know how.
Observe the work of other trades.
Look over electrical work wherever you can.
If you’re not sure, ask.
Read trade publications and manufacturers literature.
Attend trade shows.
Check material against invoice before signing for it.
No swearing, vulgar language or off-color/racist remarks.
Thank your boss for your job now and then.
If you ever get a bonus, say thanks.
Drive safely with seat belt in place.
Store material in the truck so the load will not injure you.
Tie down all ladders and other objects on the roof of vehicles.
Cover material to protect it from the elements.
Wear appropriate clothing for the elements.
Have a spare set of work clothes just in case.
Keep your first aid kit stocked and readily available.
Tools are not disposable. They are intended to be used more than once.
Know the location of the nearest emergency clinic and how to get there.
Update your first aid and CPR skills.
Notify the supervisor when damage is caused.
If you’re the last one out the door at the end, lock it.
Observe daily weather reports to anticipate hazardous changes.
Drink fluids to avoid heat stroke. Wear a hat in the sun.
Use tools only for the use they were intended.
Do not over-extend break and lunch periods.
Have several pair of dry gloves ready in winter.
If you find a lost tool, try your best to locate the proper owner.
Keep your job car in good working order.
Keep your hand tools in good working order.
No vulgar or offensive clothing (t-shirts, hats, etc.)
Be truthful when responding to supervisors.
Try to get a variety of work experience.
Volunteer for a difficult job now and then.
Go along to get along.
Put everything back where you got it.
The floor is not your personal garbage can.
Neither is the top of drop-ceiling tiles.
Care for your injuries. Stay healthy.
Own up and admit to your mistakes.
Don't take chances on ladders or scaffolding.
Don't take chances with live power.
Build up a backup set of hand tools for the day when yours are taken or lost.
Keep all company material and tools secure.
Do not use unsafe equipment. Report it immediately.
Replace hacksaw blade as often as needed.
Replace utility knife blade as often as needed.
Don’t be afraid to report theft /abuse / illegal activity.
Don't wear jewelry.
Don't antagonize or fight with other workers. Walk away.
Help other workers as needed.
Keep the radio volume at a reasonable level, if a radio is allowed.
Alcohol and drugs are absolutely forbidden.
Wear safety glasses and ear protection as appropriate.
Check your shoes/boots before entering the finished area of a building.
Be cautious working on new buildings during lightning storms.
When lifting, observe proper back position.
If something is too heavy for you ask for help.
Wear proper footgear to protect ankles from uneven ground.
Wear hard sole shoes where sharp objects like nails are present.
Wear a hard hat as required or where sensible.
Maintain GFCI in good working order.
Return phone calls promptly.
Use all safety equipment when required to.
Fill out paperwork everyday. Don’t wait until next week.
Listen closely to what you are told.
Always verify what you are told with the Codebook.
Turn your time card in well in advance of when it’s due.
This isn’t just a job……. It’s a career.
The more you put into your career, the more you will get out of it.
Your cell phone is no excuse for not working!
Put on a belt and pull up your pants to your waist!
I'm way past being an apprentice and I don't think I'd be able to check off half that list.
 

Coppersmith

Senior Member
Location
Tampa, FL, USA
Show up on time.
Keep accurate records of the times and places you worked.
Keep accurate inventory records if this is your job.
Stock the truck after using something.
Maintain company tools.
Constantly improve your knowledge and mechanical skill.
Clean up your work area.
Minimize mistakes.
Use scrap material where possible.
No side jobs except for your mom.
Study if enrolled in apprenticeship.
Keep up with the latest NEC and local code amendments.
Don't borrow tools or anything from other workers without permission.
If you borrow something and break/lose it, buy them a new one.
Inform the shop of changes in your contact information.
Learn how to read and understand blueprints, job specs, etc.
Don't bring pets, children, or friends to the job.
Don't leave early without permission.
Don't miss days without a good reason.
Ask for time off well in advance.
Schedule vacation in writing. Keep a copy.
Advise job supervisor when you can not work overtime.
No working on live circuits if you're not qualified.
You get a paycheck for working, not just showing up.
Don't expect much in the way of gratitude from anyone.
Be pleasant to customers regardless. Or leave.
Don't quote a price to anyone for anything.
Plan your work. Work your plan.
Evaluate your work each day on the way home.
Help load and unload the trucks bringing material.
Don't use the couple top steps of a ladder.
Do not climb up the ‘back side’ of a ladder.
No smoking. Period.
Do every job the best way you know how.
Observe the work of other trades.
Look over electrical work wherever you can.
If you’re not sure, ask.
Read trade publications and manufacturers literature.
Attend trade shows.
Check material against invoice before signing for it.
No swearing, vulgar language or off-color/racist remarks.
Thank your boss for your job now and then.
If you ever get a bonus, say thanks.
Drive safely with seat belt in place.
Store material in the truck so the load will not injure you.
Tie down all ladders and other objects on the roof of vehicles.
Cover material to protect it from the elements.
Wear appropriate clothing for the elements.
Have a spare set of work clothes just in case.
Keep your first aid kit stocked and readily available.
Tools are not disposable. They are intended to be used more than once.
Know the location of the nearest emergency clinic and how to get there.
Update your first aid and CPR skills.
Notify the supervisor when damage is caused.
If you’re the last one out the door at the end, lock it.
Observe daily weather reports to anticipate hazardous changes.
Drink fluids to avoid heat stroke. Wear a hat in the sun.
Use tools only for the use they were intended.
Do not over-extend break and lunch periods.
Have several pair of dry gloves ready in winter.
If you find a lost tool, try your best to locate the proper owner.
Keep your job car in good working order.
Keep your hand tools in good working order.
No vulgar or offensive clothing (t-shirts, hats, etc.)
Be truthful when responding to supervisors.
Try to get a variety of work experience.
Volunteer for a difficult job now and then.
Go along to get along.
Put everything back where you got it.
The floor is not your personal garbage can.
Neither is the top of drop-ceiling tiles.
Care for your injuries. Stay healthy.
Own up and admit to your mistakes.
Don't take chances on ladders or scaffolding.
Don't take chances with live power.
Build up a backup set of hand tools for the day when yours are taken or lost.
Keep all company material and tools secure.
Do not use unsafe equipment. Report it immediately.
Replace hacksaw blade as often as needed.
Replace utility knife blade as often as needed.
Don’t be afraid to report theft /abuse / illegal activity.
Don't wear jewelry.
Don't antagonize or fight with other workers. Walk away.
Help other workers as needed.
Keep the radio volume at a reasonable level, if a radio is allowed.
Alcohol and drugs are absolutely forbidden.
Wear safety glasses and ear protection as appropriate.
Check your shoes/boots before entering the finished area of a building.
Be cautious working on new buildings during lightning storms.
When lifting, observe proper back position.
If something is too heavy for you ask for help.
Wear proper footgear to protect ankles from uneven ground.
Wear hard sole shoes where sharp objects like nails are present.
Wear a hard hat as required or where sensible.
Maintain GFCI in good working order.
Return phone calls promptly.
Use all safety equipment when required to.
Fill out paperwork everyday. Don’t wait until next week.
Listen closely to what you are told.
Always verify what you are told with the Codebook.
Turn your time card in well in advance of when it’s due.
This isn’t just a job……. It’s a career.
The more you put into your career, the more you will get out of it.
Your cell phone is no excuse for not working!
Put on a belt and pull up your pants to your waist!
What do you tell the apprentice on day 2?
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
I’ve argued with one (he probably still believes) when he told me you are supposed to increase one wire size for every 100’ to account for voltage drop.
And he wonders why he gets beat on so many bid jobs...
Might actually come close to working out on heavier loaded 120 volt circuits. 480 volts can normally be much longer runs for same needed ampacity.
 

PaulMmn

Senior Member
Location
Union, KY, USA
As an apprentice--

You are a gofer.
You get the spit jobs.
You get to hold whatever it is that the 'pro' tells you to hold.
When the pro says, "when I nod my head, hit it!" you hit it.
 

StarCat

Senior Member
Location
Moab, UT USA
Your workspace, your truck, your tools, your Tech Library, and the shop need to be kept in impeccable order.
The Job sight should be cleaned up every day. I know a local company that runs 180 degrees out from this and it unacceptable.
Its possible to learn things from unlikely sources if you stay open minded. Always work to improve your skill set and knowledge base.
Take note of Techs with High Mastery in other Trades and get to know and be able to work with them. Choose your battles wisely.
Sometimes you will get backed into no win corners by the Monetary system and your need to survive in the backwards ass world.
Correct your grammer and spelling if you did not learn it back when you were supposed to. There are a lot of people at large that do not seem to know when to use "a " or " an ." This is a disturbing refelction of our failed education system.
Strive always to really get to the root of things you do not yet fully grasp.
Do not attempt to do High Level troubleshooting on live circuits when you are over stressed or exhausted.
I once worked for a very big outfit that insisted HVACR Techs work on Rooftop systems in pouring down rain.
This type of overlord administration is Draconian and should be Violently resisted, as its very dangerous in more ways than one.
This is the short list.

Star
 

480sparky

Senior Member
Location
Iowegia
........There are a lot of people at large that do not seem to know when to use "a " or " an ." This is a disturbing refelction of our failed education system.............
Cite, sight and site.

The inspector came to the job site, caught sight of a violation, and cited me for it.


The incorrect use of apostrophe's alway's amuse's me.
 

mayanees

Senior Member
Location
Westminster, MD
Might actually come close to working out on heavier loaded 120 volt circuits. 480 volts can normally be much longer runs for same needed ampacity.
It's a good rule of thumb to upsize wire for distances longer than the voltage rating. Using SKM Power Systems software: A 480 Volt, 480' feeder yields a 6.3% voltage drop using 50 amps on a #8 cable. Upsize that to #6 and the VD drops to 4.1 %.
A 34,500 Volt source with a 300-amp 1/0 feeder that's 34,500 feet long gives a VD of 6.4%. Upsizing the feeder to 2/0 yields a 5.3% VD. That's using a fairly stiff Utility source, but the numbers are pretty convincing.
 

anthonysolino

Senior Member
I disagree to a degree, I think we should encourage people coming in, now a days, they aren't like they used to be, the new ones don't do well with criticism unless its constructive, is what ive noticed, they shut down and eventually show no interest in the trade and its upsetting at times, ive have helpers come work with me after being with an old timer for months and they change their whole demeanor changes, I think the key is to get them interested by getting the book out with them every chance you get, explain what your doing and WHY your doing it not just "this is how you do it and I want it done this way" theres a million ways to skin a cat in this trade as long as its code and it looks neat and tidy let him run with it I know " I don't have time blah blah" some one took the time to teach a lot of us here I am sure. I don't enjoy dragging apprentices out and getting them frustrated, making some one feel like a "do boy" makes some one not want to participate any more. any chance I get I take the book out and we look at every article of what ever the task is we are working on, it helps them keep an interest and connect the dots as to WHY am I installing this wiring method In this manner. all to often I find helpers say to me " I hate this job, no one teaches me any thing, all I do is run conduit and pull a string in a pipe" no wonder why no one can find "good help" a lot of contractors scare em off by making em feel invaluable. no one is a "gofer" your an electrical apprentice, learning and educating your self, yeah you have to dig a little more than the owner will, but ill never as an owner, refuse to get a shovel and dig next to my helper, im not not any better than he is.

*just a thought :LOL:
 

480sparky

Senior Member
Location
Iowegia
I disagree to a degree.

I think we should encourage people coming in nowadays. They aren't like they used to be. The new ones don't do well with criticism unless its constructive. I've noticed they shut down and eventually show no interest in the trade and its upsetting at times.

I've had helpers come work with me after being with an old timer for months and they change their whole demeanor change. I think the key is to get them interested by getting the book out with them every chance you get, explain what you're doing and WHY you're doing it... not just, "This is how you do it and I want it done this way." There's a million ways to skin a cat in this trade. As long as it's code and it looks neat and tidy, let him run with it.

I know: "I don't have time blah blah..". Someone took the time to teach a lot of us here I am sure. I don't enjoy dragging apprentices out and getting them frustrated, making someone feel like a "do boy". Makes someone not want to participate any more. Any chance I get I take the book out and we look at every article of whatever the task is we are working on, it helps them keep an interest and connect the dots as to WHY am I installing this wiring method In this manner.

All too often I find helpers say to me ,"I hate this job, no one teaches me any thing, all I do is run conduit and pull a string in a pipe". No wonder why no one can find "good help". A lot of contractors scare em off by making em feel undervalued. No one is a "gofer"; you're an electrical apprentice, learning and educating your self. Yeah, you have to dig a little more than the owner will, but I'll never, as an owner, refuse to get a shovel and dig next to my helper. I'm not not any better than he is.

*Just a thought :LOL:
Now that it's readable.....
 

anthonysolino

Senior Member
ah who cares, I type how I type, you ain't my keeper. don't get all but hurt cause some one puts quotes where you don't want them to be. why don't you get some red ink and go ahead and correct all my mistakes that way you can teach me how to speak proper English.[/QUOTE]
 
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