Rules for apprentices

I sure like that list at the beginning of this thread. @480sparky, is it OK to copy/paste/share with others?
I am an owner for 10 years now but bill myself as the company's "oldest living 2nd year apprentice". I had finished my first year when I left the country for a few years. Upon return I went into management instead and been doing this for 42 years now.
Here's one I'd like to add to the list that I had the misfortune to experience.... NEVER trust anyone's say-so that the circuit is de-energized. ALWAYS check yourself. ALWAYS consider a circuit energized unless tested otherwise by YOU.
Caught the wrong end of a range run in an apartment conversion. pushed me all the way across the room. I was lucky though. no lasting damage. Still have my ruined T&B pliers to remind me about it 42 years later.
 

Coppersmith

Senior Member
Location
Tampa, FL, USA
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
Here's one I'd like to add to the list that I had the misfortune to experience.... NEVER trust anyone's say-so that the circuit is de-energized. ALWAYS check yourself. ALWAYS consider a circuit energized unless tested otherwise by YOU.
That's a good one that I follow. In fact, I don't even trust myself. If I walk away from something I'm working on for more than a couple of minutes, I'll recheck it before continuing work.
 

Wykkyd_1

Member
Location
E. Texas
Occupation
Master Electrician - Maint. Supervisor
Show up on time.
Keep accurate records of the times and places you worked.
Keep accurate inventory records if this is your job.
Stock the truck after using something.
Maintain company tools.
Constantly improve your knowledge and mechanical skill.
Clean up your work area.
Minimize mistakes.
Use scrap material where possible.
No side jobs except for your mom.
Study if enrolled in apprenticeship.
Keep up with the latest NEC and local code amendments.
Don't borrow tools or anything from other workers without permission.
If you borrow something and break/lose it, buy them a new one.
Inform the shop of changes in your contact information.
Learn how to read and understand blueprints, job specs, etc.
Don't bring pets, children, or friends to the job.
Don't leave early without permission.
Don't miss days without a good reason.
Ask for time off well in advance.
Schedule vacation in writing. Keep a copy.
Advise job supervisor when you can not work overtime.
No working on live circuits if you're not qualified.
You get a paycheck for working, not just showing up.
Don't expect much in the way of gratitude from anyone.
Be pleasant to customers regardless. Or leave.
Don't quote a price to anyone for anything.
Plan your work. Work your plan.
Evaluate your work each day on the way home.
Help load and unload the trucks bringing material.
Don't use the couple top steps of a ladder.
Do not climb up the ‘back side’ of a ladder.
No smoking. Period.
Do every job the best way you know how.
Observe the work of other trades.
Look over electrical work wherever you can.
If you’re not sure, ask.
Read trade publications and manufacturers literature.
Attend trade shows.
Check material against invoice before signing for it.
No swearing, vulgar language or off-color/racist remarks.
Thank your boss for your job now and then.
If you ever get a bonus, say thanks.
Drive safely with seat belt in place.
Store material in the truck so the load will not injure you.
Tie down all ladders and other objects on the roof of vehicles.
Cover material to protect it from the elements.
Wear appropriate clothing for the elements.
Have a spare set of work clothes just in case.
Keep your first aid kit stocked and readily available.
Tools are not disposable. They are intended to be used more than once.
Know the location of the nearest emergency clinic and how to get there.
Update your first aid and CPR skills.
Notify the supervisor when damage is caused.
If you’re the last one out the door at the end, lock it.
Observe daily weather reports to anticipate hazardous changes.
Drink fluids to avoid heat stroke. Wear a hat in the sun.
Use tools only for the use they were intended.
Do not over-extend break and lunch periods.
Have several pair of dry gloves ready in winter.
If you find a lost tool, try your best to locate the proper owner.
Keep your job car in good working order.
Keep your hand tools in good working order.
No vulgar or offensive clothing (t-shirts, hats, etc.)
Be truthful when responding to supervisors.
Try to get a variety of work experience.
Volunteer for a difficult job now and then.
Go along to get along.
Put everything back where you got it.
The floor is not your personal garbage can.
Neither is the top of drop-ceiling tiles.
Care for your injuries. Stay healthy.
Own up and admit to your mistakes.
Don't take chances on ladders or scaffolding.
Don't take chances with live power.
Build up a backup set of hand tools for the day when yours are taken or lost.
Keep all company material and tools secure.
Do not use unsafe equipment. Report it immediately.
Replace hacksaw blade as often as needed.
Replace utility knife blade as often as needed.
Don’t be afraid to report theft /abuse / illegal activity.
Don't wear jewelry.
Don't antagonize or fight with other workers. Walk away.
Help other workers as needed.
Keep the radio volume at a reasonable level, if a radio is allowed.
Alcohol and drugs are absolutely forbidden.
Wear safety glasses and ear protection as appropriate.
Check your shoes/boots before entering the finished area of a building.
Be cautious working on new buildings during lightning storms.
When lifting, observe proper back position.
If something is too heavy for you ask for help.
Wear proper footgear to protect ankles from uneven ground.
Wear hard sole shoes where sharp objects like nails are present.
Wear a hard hat as required or where sensible.
Maintain GFCI in good working order.
Return phone calls promptly.
Use all safety equipment when required to.
Fill out paperwork everyday. Don’t wait until next week.
Listen closely to what you are told.
Always verify what you are told with the Codebook.
Turn your time card in well in advance of when it’s due.
This isn’t just a job……. It’s a career.
The more you put into your career, the more you will get out of it.
Your cell phone is no excuse for not working!
Put on a belt and pull up your pants to your waist!
It's an excellent list. Is also a crying shame that anyone old enough to apprentice doesn't know the majority of it already, nowadays. I'm 60 and knew most of it before 16. A long list, but unfortunately too necessary.
 

petersonra

Senior Member
Location
Northern illinois
Occupation
engineer
No wonder no one wants to be a trades man these days.

You should should treat your apprentices like human beings and not like lackeys or some kind of subhumans.
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Location
-
Occupation
Engineer/Technician
No wonder no one wants to be a trades man these days.

You should should treat your apprentices like human beings and not like lackeys or some kind of subhumans.
Not sure what your referring to, but I don’t think the list 480 sparky made was in anyway “lackey” or subhuman..
Actually its a list to go by that shows common decency, manners, and respect for others time and their equipment.
I’m far from an apprentice and I go by a list like that daily.
 

petersonra

Senior Member
Location
Northern illinois
Occupation
engineer
Not sure what your referring to, but I don’t think the list 480 sparky made was in anyway “lackey” or subhuman..
Actually its a list to go by that shows common decency, manners, and respect for others time and their equipment.
I’m far from an apprentice and I go by a list like that daily.
I was referring to some of the remarks along the lines of apprentices should be seen and not heard.
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Location
-
Occupation
Engineer/Technician
I was referring to some of the remarks along the lines of apprentices should be seen and not heard.
Sometimes that is good also.
I believe it was Abe Lincoln that said, “better to be thought of a fool than to open your mouth and remove all doubt”
 

iceworm

Curmudgeon still using printed IEEE Color Books
Location
North of the 65 parallel
Occupation
EE (Field - as little design as possible)
No wonder no one wants to be a trades man these days.

You should should treat your apprentices like human beings and not like lackeys or some kind of subhumans.
Not sure what your referring to, but I don’t think the list 480 sparky made was in anyway “lackey” or subhuman.. ...
Bob -
You are right on. That is what I saw 50 years ago. And I haven't seen much change.
Generally speaking - Damned disgusting
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Location
-
Occupation
Engineer/Technician
Bob -
You are right on. That is what I saw 50 years ago. And I haven't seen much change.
Generally speaking - Damned disgusting

???

What is disgusting about acting decent and having respect?
:unsure:
 

iceworm

Curmudgeon still using printed IEEE Color Books
Location
North of the 65 parallel
Occupation
EE (Field - as little design as possible)
I don't think we are on the same page
50 years ago, I didn't see anything decent or respectful about the JW ranting at the apprentice - part of the rant including, "You're my b___h!

Still don't
 

Hv&Lv

Senior Member
Location
-
Occupation
Engineer/Technician
I don't think we are on the same page
50 years ago, I didn't see anything decent or respectful about the JW ranting at the apprentice - part of the rant including, "You're my b___h!

Still don't
Yeah, ok...
I don’t see any good in that type of treatment either.

we have three really good ones now about 22-24 years old.
they don’t have the entitlement attitude of many their age. They work hard, and are eager to learn.
they also know how to talk the trash and keep up with the work.
it makes for a great day actually.
looking at 480 sparks list though, ours follow this list. They are respectful, decent, hard working guys.
i wish we had five more exactly like them.
 

hillbilly1

Senior Member
Location
Atlanta,Ga
Here's one I'd like to add to the list that I had the misfortune to experience.... NEVER trust anyone's say-so that the circuit is de-energized. ALWAYS check yourself. ALWAYS consider a circuit energized unless tested otherwise by YOU.
Learned that one in high school, I was replacing a busted floor receptacle in the typing classroom, Principle said he turned the circuit off. Got a little tingle, so I shorted it against the box, yeah, it is dead now! LOL!
 

PaulMmn

Senior Member
Location
Union, KY, USA
Learned that one in high school, I was replacing a busted floor receptacle in the typing classroom, Principle said he turned the circuit off. Got a little tingle, so I shorted it against the box, yeah, it is dead now! LOL!
It's always entertaining to find out what else is on the same circuit this way!!
 

PaulMmn

Senior Member
Location
Union, KY, USA
Aren't you going to find out anyway when you do shut it off via some other tracing/locating method?
Tracing and locating? Bah! Too much trouble! :) Shorting it out gets the right breaker the -first- time! None of that "Maybe it's -this- one!" nonsense!
Besides-- tracing and locating might give everyone advance notice. That cuts out half the fun of people running around and screaming that they haven't saved their document all day and it's due tomorrow!
[the devil made me say that!]
 

hillbilly1

Senior Member
Location
Atlanta,Ga
It's always entertaining to find out what else is on the same circuit this way!!
I noticed your avatar is water flowing out of an outlet, I actually seen that in a Best Buy vestibule! Ceiling mounted receptacle for the open sign. They had a major roof leak above the Sheetrock ceiling, and that was the only drain! LOL!
 
Top