Rules for apprentices

anthonysolino

Senior Member
Who cares?

1. YOU should care.

2. Someone who would like to respond, but can't make heads or tails of your ramblings. Truthfully, your huge post will give most folks a headache. They'll give up.

Bt if u want to rite lk a 8yo.....
I will do a better job-sorry my grammar is upsetting-my post about PVC was not that hard to read-if that is what you are referring to
 

PaulMmn

Senior Member
Location
Union, KY, USA
A and AN...
Unlike most rules in American English, the rule for A and AN is based on sound! The sound you'd hear if you read the sentence out loud.
If a word begins with a consonant sound, you use A. A horse. A hospital. A historic. A camel. A yo-yo. A youngster. A telephone
If a word begins with a vowel sound, your use AN. AN aardvark. AN eagle. AN elephant.

So, it's A historic.
 

anthonysolino

Senior Member
A and AN...
Unlike most rules in American English, the rule for A and AN is based on sound! The sound you'd hear if you read the sentence out loud.
If a word begins with a consonant sound, you use A. A horse. A hospital. A historic. A camel. A yo-yo. A youngster. A telephone
If a word begins with a vowel sound, your use AN. AN aardvark. AN eagle. AN elephant.

So, it's A historic.
ah man I got a D on my English quiz :cry:
 

charlie b

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Seattle, WA
I’ve argued with one (he probably still believes) when he told me you are supposed to increase one wire size for every 100’ to account for voltage drop.
I put that (or something similar) on my drawings, so you will have to include it in your bid price. It applies to 20 amp, 120 volt, single phase circuits. For 20 amp, 277 volt circuits (e.g., lighting), the distance is 200 feet.
 

charlie b

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Seattle, WA
So, it's A historic.
It's not as simple as that. If there is one inviolate rule in the English language, it is, "No rule is inviolate, not even this one." (OK, I made that up.)

For the present discussion, both "a historic" and "an historic" are technically acceptable. To my ear, "an historic" sounds better. But then, (1) The trend in the American version of English over the past many decades is to prefer "a historic," and (2) I am getting somewhat "long in the tooth," so what was good 40+ years ago can still be OK by me.
 

PaulMmn

Senior Member
Location
Union, KY, USA
It's not as simple as that. If there is one inviolate rule in the English language, it is, "No rule is inviolate, not even this one." (OK, I made that up.)

For the present discussion, both "a historic" and "an historic" are technically acceptable. To my ear, "an historic" sounds better. But then, (1) The trend in the American version of English over the past many decades is to prefer "a historic," and (2) I am getting somewhat "long in the tooth," so what was good 40+ years ago can still be OK by me.
Would you say A hospital or AN hospital. Same rule applies to Hospitals and Historics.
 
It's not as simple as that. If there is one inviolate rule in the English language, it is, "No rule is inviolate, not even this one." (OK, I made that up.)

For the present discussion, both "a historic" and "an historic" are technically acceptable. To my ear, "an historic" sounds better. But then, (1) The trend in the American version of English over the past many decades is to prefer "a historic," and (2) I am getting somewhat "long in the tooth," so what was good 40+ years ago can still be OK by me.
I don’t know about this... it’s starting to sound a lot like Journeyman stuff to me.


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stevenje

Senior Member
Location
Yachats Oregon
I'm an electrical instructor at the high school level and would like input regarding advice for new apprentices. I've seen some great info from plumbers regarding apprentices. Top 10 list of expectations, arrive on time, keep track of what has been taken from the van so that it can be replaced, etc. Getting input from someone besides the teacher is sometimes better received.
The electrical trade is a profession, not just a job.
 

Fmkehoe

Senior Member
Location
Cornwall ny USA
Dang! That’s a heck of a list...
How long have you been compiling this list?
Its not to much to ask though from any employee, not just apprentices.
I actually read through the list and I agree with every point, even as an employee.
I did too. Great list. I sent it to a buddy that has a contracting business and he wrote back, “that’s too long to read”
He may be the problem, not the apprentice. Lol.
 

ggunn

PE (Electrical), NABCEP certified
Location
Austin, TX, USA
Occupation
Electrical Engineer - Photovoltaic Systems
I just say what ever normally comes out of my mouth at the given point in time.
My issue is with posts that are a solid block of text with embedded changes of subject, perspective, etc. Usually I cannot force myself to slog all the way through them; paragraphs help readability a lot. I'm not telling you what to do, I'm just telling you that I probably won't read it if your post looks like that.
 

GoldDigger

Moderator
Staff member
It's not as simple as that. If there is one inviolate rule in the English language, it is, "No rule is inviolate, not even this one." (OK, I made that up.)

For the present discussion, both "a historic" and "an historic" are technically acceptable. To my ear, "an historic" sounds better. But then, (1) The trend in the American version of English over the past many decades is to prefer "a historic," and (2) I am getting somewhat "long in the tooth," so what was good 40+ years ago can still be OK by me.
A factor in this is the British dialect tendency to omit leading H sounds. So "an istoric" sounds just fine. "In 'Artford, 'Erreford and 'Ampshire....." (My Fair Lady)

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