Article 100 Definition Addition! SHORT CIRCUIT

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ibew441dc

Senior Member
The last incarnation of your proposal still stated that a short was only between two ungrounded conductors, I believe, which I still disagree with. If you were to create a definition and try to sell it to the CMP, then I would say:

Short Circuit: An intentional or unintentional low-impedance connection between two insulated conductors.
I would say anything wrong other than that is a ground fault.
My last incarnation did not limit a short as being between 2 ungrounded conductors.......go back and look.
Originally Posted by IBEW441DC
Short Circuit-An intentional or unintentional, low impedance conducting connection, between any ungrounded conductor(s) establishing a difference of potential, or between any ungrounded conductor(s) and a grounded conductor,or between any ungrounded conductor(s) and an equipment grounding conductor.

FPN (1): A Ground Fault is not a short circuit when subject to high impedance (see Article 250.2 Definitions).
FPN (2): An Arc Fault is not a short circuit due to high impedance.
FPN (3): A Short Circuit is not an intentional or unintentional electrical conducting connection between a grounded conductor and an equipment grounding conductor.(see 250.6 Objectionable Current) An example of objectionable current is neutral current flowing on paths other than permitted by the Code.
As far as your comments to the other rules where the terms short circuit and ground fault are equal.....I still firmly disagree. A Ground Fault by definition is a defined path. A Short Circuit by accepted definition has low impedance. A Ground Fault may or may not have low impedance, where a short circuit always does. Following the same logic, an Arc Fault is not a short circuit due to high impedance.
 

ibew441dc

Senior Member
GeorgeStolz,Regardless of your comments made about enforceability, terms being equal ect. The following quote by don_resqcapt19 is what I was responding to.

There are code rule applications that hinge on knowing what a neutral is. I am not aware of any code rule applications that hinge on knowing what a short circuit is.
My point in the matter is that there is plenty of room for "Qualified Persons" to have a respectable debate and hold terms accountable.
 

George Stolz

Moderator
Staff member
My last incarnation did not limit a short as being between 2 ungrounded conductors.......go back and look.
I appreciate the update. :cool:

Following the same logic, an Arc Fault is not a short circuit due to high impedance.
If it has high impedance, then "short circuit protection" isn't going to act upon it, so it's not a short circuit then, is it?
 

ibew441dc

Senior Member
I appreciate the update. :cool:



If it has high impedance, then "short circuit protection" isn't going to act upon it, so it's not a short circuit then, is it?

Correct!:smile:.......take an Arc Fault for example, it is very likely that in the event of an Arc Fault, "short circuit protection" will do nothing(thats what AFCI's are for), due to the characteristics of an Arc Fault having high impedance. Thus I come to the conclusion that an Arc Fault is not a short circuit.
 
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