Recpt height

Status
Not open for further replies.

Benton

Senior Member
Location
Louisiana
Simple question? I can't remember there ever being a code for recpt height. I can remember it being specified but not code. Please correct mr if I'm wrong.
 

macmikeman

Senior Member
Simple question? I can't remember there ever being a code for recpt height. I can remember it being specified but not code. Please correct mr if I'm wrong.
Depends. If you mean minimum height then when its in specific hazardous areas like fueling stations its got to be minimum 18". If you mean max height then 5'- 6" for general purpose receptacle outlets. No code for minimum height in dwellings if that is what you mean.
 

Dennis Alwon

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Chapel Hill, NC
Occupation
Electrical Contractor
There is an ADA (American with Disabilities Act) that requires minimum of 15" and a max of 48" with 2 exceptions-- floor recep. and recep. for specific equipment. This act does not apply to dwellings unless it is for the disabled.

BTW, there is never a simple answer around here. :grin:
 

M4gery

Senior Member
A 12 inch piece of scrap 2x4 doesn't cost me anything.
Sure it does, added labor cost to pay men to keep track of and fumble around with a block of wood when his hands are already full. The hammer is already in the hand, it's the fastest way.
 

Rewire

Senior Member
Sure it does, added labor cost to pay men to keep track of and fumble around with a block of wood when his hands are already full. The hammer is already in the hand, it's the fastest way.
If he can't keep track of a piece of wood how would i expect him to keep track of a hammer I had to pay for? Set the wood ,set the box, nail the box just three steps.
Set the hammer , set the box, move the hammer(risk of the box shifting), nail the box thats four steps.
three steps v four steps
 

Rewire

Senior Member
Until someone picks up a similar-but-not-quite-the-same-length piece of another 2x4.

I use a hammer making sure the same hammer is used throughout.
But what if someone picks up a hammer of a different hieght?

A sharpie and a quick symbol of a recep.marked on the 2x4 and problem solved
 

M4gery

Senior Member
If he can't keep track of a piece of wood how would i expect him to keep track of a hammer I had to pay for?
The hammer goes on his belt, it's always there.

Using a hammer to measure the box height is much faster than using a block of wood, there's nothing to argue about.
 

Rewire

Senior Member
The hammer goes on his belt, it's always there.

Using a hammer to measure the box height is much faster than using a block of wood, there's nothing to argue about.
Faster is not always better , eyeballing it is faster. Why would a hammer be faster to measure with?
Measure with a screw driver it would still take the same amount of time.The item you use to measure has nothing to do with the speed of the measurement.
What I look at is consistant box hieght with a hammer you must move your measuring device (hammer) that allows for the real possibility of the box moving creating inconsistant height.
With a 2x4 it stays in place during the nailing process thereby giving a greater probability of a consistant height.
 

M4gery

Senior Member
Faster is not always better , eyeballing it is faster.
But eyeballing is not accurate.
Why would a hammer be faster to measure with?
Because it's already in your hand, it never has to leave. You don't have to deal with a 3rd object.

One simple motion is all it takes, tap the hammer to the bottom plate and the box to the butt of the hammer and swing. It takes about a second from start to hammering the nail. The hammer stays in your hand as you move to the next box, you don't have to fumble with a block of wood.
Measure with a screw driver it would still take the same amount of time.The item you use to measure has nothing to do with the speed of the measurement.
I disagree, when the item you measure with is in your hand, it is much faster than using a 3rd item, like a black of wood or a screwdriver.
What I look at is consistant box hieght with a hammer you must move your measuring device (hammer) that allows for the real possibility of the box moving creating inconsistant height.
Incorrect. If you can't hold the box against the stud without it moving, you shouldn't be allowed to do electrical work.
With a 2x4 it stays in place during the nailing process thereby giving a greater probability of a consistant height.
This is what we call a "crutch", this is something I would expect from a 1st year helper who hasn't come into his own yet. It is unnecessary when dealing with experienced workers and adds to the installation time.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top