Sub Contractor for Turner Construction

LMIJOE

Member
Location
Tucker, GA USA
Has anyone had experience working with Turner Construction as an electrical contractor. I am curious about the details of their safety program with a focus on the "ladder last resort" program. How does that effect scheduling.
 

roger

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Fl
Occupation
Electrician
Yes, and it causes a lot of problems and expense to you. And another big expense depending on the number of people that you will have on the project is that every person will have to waste a day watching movies before they will be allowed to work on the project.

Roger
 

roger

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Fl
Occupation
Electrician
What is ladder last resort program.
Basically they do not want ladders on their projects, they want lifts, scaffolds, or any other means besides ladders. If you are going to use a ladder you must fill out paper work the day before.

Roger
 

PetrosA

Senior Member
So... setting four milk crates on the top of a scaffold and setting up a six foot A-frame on them would be a no-no? ;)

In all seriousness, does this also apply to smaller ladders or the newer type of platform ladders, like a four footer or a 18"-24" folding platform? It would seem pretty ridiculous to get a lift or scaffold set up if you only need to get 1-2 feet higher than ground level just so you can have a safety rail around you.
 

GoldDigger

Moderator
Staff member
So... setting four milk crates on the top of a scaffold and setting up a six foot A-frame on them would be a no-no? ;)

In all seriousness, does this also apply to smaller ladders or the newer type of platform ladders, like a four footer or a 18"-24" folding platform? It would seem pretty ridiculous to get a lift or scaffold set up if you only need to get 1-2 feet higher than ground level just so you can have a safety rail around you.
How do they feel about drywaller type stilts?
:)
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
We work for them all of the time and their no ladder policy is absurd. I honestly don't know how my boss makes money on their jobs.
 

PetrosA

Senior Member
Considering they want all this:


Copy of W-9
List of company license numbers
List of state sales tax numbers
List of state unemployment insurance numbers
List of insurance agreements
List of current projects
List of recently completed projects
Current financial statement

Bank information
Dun and Bradstreet information
Surety information
3 supplier references
3 contractor references
Independent verification letter supporting your EMR for last 3 years
OSHA 300 logs from last 3 years
Insurance information

Plus they won't let me use my handy-dandy four-footer? They can go pound sand.
 

wtucker

Senior Member
Location
Connecticut
We work for them all of the time and their no ladder policy is absurd. I honestly don't know how my boss makes money on their jobs.
Your boss makes money because he builds the "ladders last" program into his bid, just like the other subs do. Turner wants it, and they're willing to pay for it. Turner's other program, "Nothing Hits the Ground" is designed to eliminate waste. Contractors who learn to do that well make even more money.
 

sandsnow

Senior Member
This was years ago, but Turner came to our office to show us their safety program. I remember something like they are self insured or something.

The last job I inspected everyone had to wear at least fingerless gloves. Some inspectors had a hissy fit. Some inspectors are such primadonas. They gave me a pair of gloves to wear. No big deal.

I think the least we as inspectors can do is to abide by jobsite safety rules. After all we're asking them to abide by the Codes. I know they're bound by law to do it anyway.

It's about mutual respect.

I know this is different than your issue with the ladder safety.
 

PetrosA

Senior Member
...

The last job I inspected everyone had to wear at least fingerless gloves. Some inspectors had a hissy fit. Some inspectors are such primadonas. They gave me a pair of gloves to wear. No big deal.

...
I can certainly understand the other inspectors. The last time many of us were forced to do silly things was in grade school. Forcing a grown individual to wear fingerless gloves while performing an inspection would, at first glance, appear to be an affront to any educated intelligence. Aside from needing to remain open-minded as a guest on a jobsite, there should also be some understanding on the part of those who make up their own safety rules and they should be willing to go above and beyond the call of duty to explain those rules to the uninitiated guest. If they can't do that, then maybe those rules really are just silly.
 

sandsnow

Senior Member
I can certainly understand the other inspectors. The last time many of us were forced to do silly things was in grade school. Forcing a grown individual to wear fingerless gloves while performing an inspection would, at first glance, appear to be an affront to any educated intelligence. Aside from needing to remain open-minded as a guest on a jobsite, there should also be some understanding on the part of those who make up their own safety rules and they should be willing to go above and beyond the call of duty to explain those rules to the uninitiated guest. If they can't do that, then maybe those rules really are just silly.
Everybody wore gloves from laborers up to superintendents. Not sure, but I think owners also. It was a long time ago. It's hard to remember exactly, but in Turner's eyes it was simpler to have everybody do it.

I can't understand the other inspectors. They think rules apply to people they're inspecting, but not them. These guys would abuse their authority to say they don't need to wear work boots, safety glasses, vests, hard hats or long pants. You'd think they were being asked to wear a pink tutu.
 

PetrosA

Senior Member
Everybody wore gloves from laborers up to superintendents. Not sure, but I think owners also. It was a long time ago. It's hard to remember exactly, but in Turner's eyes it was simpler to have everybody do it.

I can't understand the other inspectors. They think rules apply to people they're inspecting, but not them. These guys would abuse their authority to say they don't need to wear work boots, safety glasses, vests, hard hats or long pants. You'd think they were being asked to wear a pink tutu.
I totally understand the rest of that list. They are all industry standard safety items. The fingerless gloves, on the other hand...
 

iwire

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Massachusetts
I totally understand the rest of that list. They are all industry standard safety items. The fingerless gloves, on the other hand...
Gloves will be the standard soon enough.

The company I work for them has started supplying and requiring gloves to be worn.

It comes right down to money, the cost for laceration that requires a doctors visit is just too high to ignore.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
Your boss makes money because he builds the "ladders last" program into his bid, just like the other subs do. Turner wants it, and they're willing to pay for it. Turner's other program, "Nothing Hits the Ground" is designed to eliminate waste. Contractors who learn to do that well make even more money.
No one would get a job if they actually bid for all of the stupidity that these guys can think up. OSHA has a restrictive set of work rules that these contractors revise and come up with their own more restrictive stuff. Really, no ladders on the job because a lot of injuries are from ladders? What's next no hammer drills because we had less injuries with star chisels and lump hammers? :cool:
 
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