Working in NJ

gadfly56

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Professional Engineer, Fire & Life Safety
So your advice to the OP (who wants to fix his grandmothers house) is not to call the AHJ but to call the BOEE?


Yeah go with that.↑↑


He isn't looking to become a contractor here, he wants to help his grandmother.
He wants to know whether he can do it without getting himself or his grandmother in trouble. He needs permits, that's a given. The AHJ either wants to see a raised seal, or an affidavit (which is accomplised by signing the permit jacket) that the 90 year old grandmother will be pulling the wire. Me, I wouldn't see a problem with a dutiful grandson lending a helping hand, but I'm not in charge of enforcing the UCC. Better yet, call the BOEE and the DCA and follow the one that gives you the answer you need.
 

Gold

Member
Location
US
The homeowner is allowed to pull there own permit. Whats the problem?

He is helping his Grandmother. I think your over complicating it. The only issue would be wether or not he would need a cert if the house was sold within 4 (or 7) years. Ask the AHJ.
 

RICK NAPIER

Senior Member
Location
New Jersey
In the NJ permit application second page of the jacket there is a section identified as "certification in lieu of oath" section C is were a homeowner checks off the type of work they will be responsible for.

C ( ) I further certify that I will perform or supervise the following work.

C1 ( ) Building C2 ( ) Fire Protection

( ) I further certify that I will perform the following work.

C3 ( ) Electrical C4 ( ) Plumbing

As you see, a homeowner is to certify that they are performing the electrical or plumbing work themselves. The enforcement of this provision varies in different municipalities.
 

guschash

Senior Member
Location
Ohio
Ok thanks Rick. It up in air when we will be going. The longer those house go without power the worst it is going to get it. I wish there was more I could do.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
He wants to know whether he can do it without getting himself or his grandmother in trouble. He needs permits, that's a given. The AHJ either wants to see a raised seal, or an affidavit (which is accomplised by signing the permit jacket) that the 90 year old grandmother will be pulling the wire. Me, I wouldn't see a problem with a dutiful grandson lending a helping hand, but I'm not in charge of enforcing the UCC. Better yet, call the BOEE and the DCA and follow the one that gives you the answer you need.
So in the aftermath of widespread destruction, they are going to slow down the rebuilding process over having proper plans with raised seals on them? If you are starting over and putting up a complete new building - maybe that is understandable, if you are just repairing what was damaged and for the most part rebuilding to similar performance of what was there before that is just a bunch of BS. If they are going to look at every detail of every damaged property as it is rebuilt they had better bring in a bunch of inspectors and permit administration people also, or it will be weeks or months before some can even get their permits approved and proceed with rebuilding.
 

jmellc

Senior Member
Location
Central NC
With all the destruction and mayhem in that area, one would think ANY licensed electrician would be welcomed with open arms. The red tape between states is ridiculous. If I remember correctly, the "N" in NEC stands for national as in all the states...........
Yes, as far as the operating code most jurisdictions use. But that is not the same as the licensing authorities. Each state has its own licensing board that issues licenses in that state.
 

infinity

Moderator
Staff member
Location
New Jersey
Occupation
Journeyman Electrician
There is no reciprocity so that leaves having your 90 year old grandmother pulling the permits or you finding a licensed EC who will help you. The code official may have a problem with a 90 year old person signing for a permit to perform the work themselves.
 

kwired

Electron manager
Location
NE Nebraska
There is no reciprocity so that leaves having your 90 year old grandmother pulling the permits or you finding a licensed EC who will help you. The code official may have a problem with a 90 year old person signing for a permit to perform the work themselves.
They are not supposed to discriminate based on race, sex, religion, age​...
 
Location
US
They are not supposed to discriminate based on race, sex, religion, age​...
Agreed. Either way, I've seen 90 year olds breakdancing!

And if the owner of the house pulled a permit, I can't see anything wrong with other occupants helping them with the work as long as it wasn't for pay.
 

cowboyjwc

Moderator
Staff member
Location
Simi Valley, CA
One of the things you also need to be careful with, is if it has been declard a federal disaster area and there is federal money being used for the rebuilding.

Not saying that all of the same permiting rules don't apply, just may be a lot more paperwork involved.
 
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